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Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Movie 7" Scale Tokka & Rahzar 2-Pack Becomes A Made To Order NECA Exclusive And An Update For The Deluxe Super Shredder

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NECA today has announced that the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Movie 7" Scale Tokka & Rahzar 2-Pack will no long be sold at Walmart like was originally said. Now the figure will go up for pre-order on NECA's own online store stating this Friday 7/31 to Friday(8/7). Customers in the US and over 20 international countries will have 1 week to place their pre-order.

The set will cost $70 and is said to start shipping out in 3 month (November). They will be limited 2 per household and will be done as a made to order item. Which means the pre-order isn't going to sell out during the week it's up. Now once the week is over, that is it. According to NECA this will be the only way to acquire the Tokka & Rahzar 2 Pack!

The Deluxe Super Shredder figure will also be available online through NECA's website shortly after the Tokka & Rahzar 2 Pack sale ends. Shredder which will also be available at physical Walmart stores WON'T be done as a pre-order, so it can sell out. They have said that they did significantly increase quantities for both online and physical store sales on Shredder, so hopefully it won't be as hard to find as other stuff. NECA to there credit has also taken steps on their own website to try and slow down the scalper bots.

For more details on all this be sure to check out Pixel Dan's recent interview with NECA's Randy Falk.

Check out new images for Tokka & Rahzar below.

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I am perfectly willing to call a toy manufacturer or retailer on BS things that are making this hobby very difficult to participate in, but I am also willing to acknowledge that this stuff isn't always so cut and dry when you have to balance so many angles that come into play with the business end of things. And I think NECA has made a nice legit first attempt here in trying to  fix these problems, beyond just giving us lip service. So hats off to Randy and NECA for this.

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Frankly, I don't think it's a big improvement over the current issue, but hey!, at least there is a willingness on Neca's part to improve the shopping experience and availability, even if it's just one of many releases that were a pain.

Certain companies should take note of this example and for "certain companies" I'm referring to Hasbro.

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8 minutes ago, Mr_Scary92 said:

Frankly, I don't think it's a big improvement over the current issue, but hey!, at least there is a willingness on Neca's part to improve the shopping experience and availability, even if it's just one of many releases that were a pain.

Certain companies should take note of this example and for "certain companies" I'm referring to Hasbro.

It 100% fixes the main problem at least in regards to Tokka & Rahzar 2-Pack.  If you want that set you now have an assured way of getting it at cost. You dont have to worry about scalper bots or paying secondary prices, and while you won't get the set immediately, there is only a 3 month delay. It's not a perfect solution and I would personally like to see them work more with small etailers that support this hobby more for this kind of thing than selling it directly themselves, but its probably the best solution we are every going to see in this day and age.

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Sweet. This has just just turned into about a $91 purchase instead of an $86 purchase in store. I understand that the walmart online sales have been quite a joke, and that something needs to be done about that. But I've been able to find the figures in store without much trouble at all. I've seen the Casey Jones & Raph set on 3 separate occasions, for a total of seeing 5 of those sets on the shelf.

Again, I dig the idea of the Made to Order Pre-Order solution. But sell em at walmart in store still.

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34 minutes ago, worldwarhulk said:

But I've been able to find the figures in store without much trouble at all. I've seen the Casey Jones & Raph set on 3 separate occasions, for a total of seeing 5 of those sets on the shelf.

Consider yourself lucky in that regard.

37 minutes ago, worldwarhulk said:

Again, I dig the idea of the Made to Order Pre-Order solution. But sell em at walmart in store still.

Neca has proposed an  alternative, but yes, they already had an agreement with Walmart, I wonder where that agreement will be now.

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I am ok with this if it ensures I get them. I do most of my figure purchasing online these days anyway. I dont like that I will have to wait 3 months but if it ensures I can actually obtain them instead of scouring the tri state using up my gas and getting my hopes up to find nothing every time or paying scalper prices, then that is just fine with me. Super Shredder Im much more concerned about getting since he could sell out and Ive only heard bad things about ordering items off NECAs store. Fingers crossed I suppose. 

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I'm cool with this Tokka & Rahzar thing, at least this means I can get these figures, and it's being offered up to us Internationally so I'm cool, I mean I probably would pay less if it showed up in a store, but it wouldn't probably anyways... it seems a bit more grim with the Super Shredder but I think I don't necessarily need him so badly as I do Tokka & Rahzar, he maybe just might have to be left out like Casey Jones for now which I have made peace with

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This sounds like a good move in a good direction.  Unfortunately sounds like their agreement with Target still has their hands tied with the animated line, but at least this seems like a promising step in the right direction for movie figures.  

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THIS.  This is EXACTLY what the ENTIRE collectors' toy industry should become!!
<P>
No more flash sales that end in seconds.
<P>
No more "subscriptions" so you have to buy half a dozen toys you don't want.
<P>
No more kowtowing to predatory ultra-capitalist mega-corps that exploit their workers and squeeze their suppliers.
<P>
No more "Ambassador Programs" involving slack-off locals who never check or restock shelves.
<P>
No more stock shortages, you make what people already paid you for.
<P>
Just submit a figure concept, see if people want it.  If enough people order it, you make it.  Success lives on the customers' shoulders.  Everyone has a chance to order, everyone gets what they want.  This is PERFECT!!
<P>
Now, can NECA PLEASE tell Target to go @#$% themselves?? *LOL*

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2 hours ago, Batman1701 said:

THIS.  This is EXACTLY what the ENTIRE collectors' toy industry should become!!
<P>
No more flash sales that end in seconds.
<P>
No more "subscriptions" so you have to buy half a dozen toys you don't want.
<P>
No more kowtowing to predatory ultra-capitalist mega-corps that exploit their workers and squeeze their suppliers.
<P>
No more "Ambassador Programs" involving slack-off locals who never check or restock shelves.
<P>
No more stock shortages, you make what people already paid you for.
<P>
Just submit a figure concept, see if people want it.  If enough people order it, you make it.  Success lives on the customers' shoulders.  Everyone has a chance to order, everyone gets what they want.  This is PERFECT!!
<P>
Now, can NECA PLEASE tell Target to go @#$% themselves?? *LOL*

Good points there, but I still think the big retail stores will continue to have a major influence over the main toy companies, sadly, simply because they have all the money. I also doubt that companies like Hasbro and Mattel can sustain their operations with a made-to-order sales model.

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15 hours ago, worldwarhulk said:

Sweet. This has just just turned into about a $91 purchase instead of an $86 purchase in store. I understand that the walmart online sales have been quite a joke, and that something needs to be done about that. But I've been able to find the figures in store without much trouble at all. I've seen the Casey Jones & Raph set on 3 separate occasions, for a total of seeing 5 of those sets on the shelf.

Again, I dig the idea of the Made to Order Pre-Order solution. But sell em at walmart in store still.

This is a good move by NECA for NECA. They could be trying to; Make all the money, Get Cash free loan, Strong arming Walmart for new deals, etc, etc.

I could go on and on. Reminds me of  the song; "Whats love got to do with it"...huh,  In our case...."Whats figure Love got to do with it"  =^)

And.....I have  "NO PROBLEM" how NECA does there biz and makes there " POWER PLAY"!!!  I have POWER too!!!! My power??? buy or I don't =^)

Don't get me wrong, some will enjoy this move and some won't (like you and me).

I have seen some good idea's on this thread and some really bazaar ones. Well.....lets see how this NECA presale plays out.

Cool thread IMHO

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18 hours ago, JayC said:

I am perfectly willing to call a toy manufacturer or retailer on BS things that are making this hobby very difficult to participate in, but I am also willing to acknowledge that this stuff isn't always so cut and dry when you have to balance so many angles that come into play with the business end of things. And I think NECA has made a nice legit first attempt here in trying to  fix these problems, beyond just giving us lip service. So hats off to Randy and NECA for this.

I agree and hope NECA do the same strategy for the upcoming Bebop and Rocksteady re release...

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46 minutes ago, Mr_Scary92 said:

Good points there, but I still think the big retail stores will continue to have a major influence over the main toy companies, sadly, simply because they have all the money. I also doubt that companies like Hasbro and Mattel can sustain their operations with a made-to-order sales model.

Eeeehhhhyyyeeehh . . . as someone who's studied marketing and worked in retail management and stock ordering, I think you'd be surprised about how little influence the big retailers ACTUALLY have.  Though not necessarily for the reasons you might think.
<P>
Yes, mega-retailers exert a HUGE amount of authority over toy manufacturers because they decide what will and will not be stocked in the store.  HOWEVER . . . increasingly over the years, the mega-stores have been shrinking their toy sections, and most notably, shrinking their boys action figure aisles.
<P>
The primary reason for this?  Demographics.
<P>
Most children shop in the other aisles.  Toddlers' and children's toys are a sure bet because parents will buy anything and everything for the first five years of life.  US society is incredibly sexist, so girls toys from age 5 to 15 are pretty much the same things across the board - dolls and horses and make-up and play-cooking and glitter crafts and stuffed animals - so they can just sell the same stuff to all ages.  Boys will play with cars and Legos from 5 through adulthood.  All ages of both genders play with Nerf guns.
<P>
And then you got action figures.  Which tend to only appeal to boys, and only from ages 5 to 10, maybe 12.  Before that, they're too young for little accessories or intricate moving parts.  After that, they get more into athletics and girls.  They can play with cars before they're 5, and they will still like them as they get older, as that interest re-ignites when they start driving, and possibly if they start working on cars like many teens do.  They will keep playing with guns well into their teens.  Legos and other building toys have long-term appeal as expressions of engineering and creativity.
<P>
But action figures?  Have a comparatively short window of interest, statistically and demographically speaking.  They have a stigma attached to them, often seen as "nerdy" and childish, or they get derided as "dolls."  Sure, boys love them during childhood, but unless they developed a strong and enduring following for one specific property or another, they tend to abandon them during adolescence, so as not to be mocked.
<P>
This all serves to narrow the market, and combined with the fact that action figures are more complex to design (more joints and moving parts that dolls or cars, more tooling needed), more expensive to produce (dolls are hollow, cars are hollow and often made of metal, action figures are often solid and plastic is getting pricier), and don't have a great shelf life (how long do most children's shows with an accompanying toyline last?  3-5 years, not very long for sustainable retail income), mega-retailers have begun to care less and less about the whole concept.  Action figures just aren't that profitable, in their eyes.
<P>
And unfortunately, the ONE demographic for whom they ARE really profitable - adult collectors, with nostalgia and disposable income  - are caught in a vicious cycle: mega-stores don't take them seriously, so they mismanage stocking and ignore demand, collectors complain and refuse to shop where they are disrespected and they can never find what they want, mega-stores say "see?  We TOLD you there's no market for adult action figures!" and they don't take the customers seriously, etc.
<P>
So . . . TL;DR: yes, the mega-retailers DO control what's on the shelves, and the influence the manufactures and tell them what to make and ship and throw their weight around.  BUT, it's not because they have the money.  It's because they don't respect the people that DO have the money.  All they pay attention to is sales reports, and sales reports say "action figures don't sell.  As a result . . . the reality is that the whole reason WHY they're so pushy and restrictive on action figure sales is because THEY DON'T ACTUALLY REALLY WANT THEM in their stores.  In their eyes, it would be shelf-space better dedicated to something more profitable.
<P>
Which means . . . the "influence" is mostly an illusion.
<P>
Manufacturers bend to the retailers whims on their products because the manufacturers want to sell their products, but the retailers DON'T want to.  Toy companies think "I have to do this or I won't be able to sell any," when in reality, walking away would free them up AND the stores would be mostly indifferent.  Instead of letting Walmart and Target push them around, if toy manufactures said "well, how about we don't sell ANY action figures in your store?" the stores would most likely go "meh, whatever, we don't need them."
<P>
Which, of course, would free up the manufacturers to produce and sell figures DIRECTLY to adult customers.  Take out the middle man (that doesn't want to be doing it anyway), and everyone wins.  Toy companies will still have a good working relationship with stores through all the OTHER toys that ACTUALLY sell well to kids, stores will still probably keep a SMALL selection of adult collectibles for tradition or impulse shoppers, collectors will get what they want, toy companies make money, and the industry runs a WHOLE lot smoother!
<P>
Now, on your point that you don't think Hasbro and Mattel could sustain their business?  Uuummm . . . no, I think they'd be fine.  Because we're not talking about ALL toys, we're talking about adult action figures.  Nerf, Hot Wheels, Barbie, Imaginext, Playschool, board games, and basically every 5-12 action figure line (like Jurassic World and Titan Heroes and those cheap 5-POA superheroes, etc) would still be at retail and keep them well afloat.  Financially, Hasbro and Mattel could DEFINITELY take their adult-targeted lines straight to customers for produce-on-demand, and they'd do fine.
<P>
Now . . . whether they can MANAGE direct online sales, I got two words for you! "Digital River." *LMAO* So . . . as they say, your mileage may vary!

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22 hours ago, worldwarhulk said:

Sweet. This has just just turned into about a $91 purchase instead of an $86 purchase in store. I understand that the walmart online sales have been quite a joke, and that something needs to be done about that. But I've been able to find the figures in store without much trouble at all. I've seen the Casey Jones & Raph set on 3 separate occasions, for a total of seeing 5 of those sets on the shelf.

Again, I dig the idea of the Made to Order Pre-Order solution. But sell em at walmart in store still.

My guess Walmart didnt want it. Don't know why, perhaps because of the higher price point.

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5 hours ago, Batman1701 said:

Eeeehhhhyyyeeehh . . . as someone who's studied marketing and worked in retail management and stock ordering, I think you'd be surprised about how little influence the big retailers ACTUALLY have.  Though not necessarily for the reasons you might think.
<P>
Yes, mega-retailers exert a HUGE amount of authority over toy manufacturers because they decide what will and will not be stocked in the store.  HOWEVER . . . increasingly over the years, the mega-stores have been shrinking their toy sections, and most notably, shrinking their boys action figure aisles.
<P>
The primary reason for this?  Demographics.
<P>
Most children shop in the other aisles.  Toddlers' and children's toys are a sure bet because parents will buy anything and everything for the first five years of life.  US society is incredibly sexist, so girls toys from age 5 to 15 are pretty much the same things across the board - dolls and horses and make-up and play-cooking and glitter crafts and stuffed animals - so they can just sell the same stuff to all ages.  Boys will play with cars and Legos from 5 through adulthood.  All ages of both genders play with Nerf guns.
<P>
And then you got action figures.  Which tend to only appeal to boys, and only from ages 5 to 10, maybe 12.  Before that, they're too young for little accessories or intricate moving parts.  After that, they get more into athletics and girls.  They can play with cars before they're 5, and they will still like them as they get older, as that interest re-ignites when they start driving, and possibly if they start working on cars like many teens do.  They will keep playing with guns well into their teens.  Legos and other building toys have long-term appeal as expressions of engineering and creativity.
<P>
But action figures?  Have a comparatively short window of interest, statistically and demographically speaking.  They have a stigma attached to them, often seen as "nerdy" and childish, or they get derided as "dolls."  Sure, boys love them during childhood, but unless they developed a strong and enduring following for one specific property or another, they tend to abandon them during adolescence, so as not to be mocked.
<P>
This all serves to narrow the market, and combined with the fact that action figures are more complex to design (more joints and moving parts that dolls or cars, more tooling needed), more expensive to produce (dolls are hollow, cars are hollow and often made of metal, action figures are often solid and plastic is getting pricier), and don't have a great shelf life (how long do most children's shows with an accompanying toyline last?  3-5 years, not very long for sustainable retail income), mega-retailers have begun to care less and less about the whole concept.  Action figures just aren't that profitable, in their eyes.
<P>
And unfortunately, the ONE demographic for whom they ARE really profitable - adult collectors, with nostalgia and disposable income  - are caught in a vicious cycle: mega-stores don't take them seriously, so they mismanage stocking and ignore demand, collectors complain and refuse to shop where they are disrespected and they can never find what they want, mega-stores say "see?  We TOLD you there's no market for adult action figures!" and they don't take the customers seriously, etc.
<P>
So . . . TL;DR: yes, the mega-retailers DO control what's on the shelves, and the influence the manufactures and tell them what to make and ship and throw their weight around.  BUT, it's not because they have the money.  It's because they don't respect the people that DO have the money.  All they pay attention to is sales reports, and sales reports say "action figures don't sell.  As a result . . . the reality is that the whole reason WHY they're so pushy and restrictive on action figure sales is because THEY DON'T ACTUALLY REALLY WANT THEM in their stores.  In their eyes, it would be shelf-space better dedicated to something more profitable.
<P>
Which means . . . the "influence" is mostly an illusion.
<P>
Manufacturers bend to the retailers whims on their products because the manufacturers want to sell their products, but the retailers DON'T want to.  Toy companies think "I have to do this or I won't be able to sell any," when in reality, walking away would free them up AND the stores would be mostly indifferent.  Instead of letting Walmart and Target push them around, if toy manufactures said "well, how about we don't sell ANY action figures in your store?" the stores would most likely go "meh, whatever, we don't need them."
<P>
Which, of course, would free up the manufacturers to produce and sell figures DIRECTLY to adult customers.  Take out the middle man (that doesn't want to be doing it anyway), and everyone wins.  Toy companies will still have a good working relationship with stores through all the OTHER toys that ACTUALLY sell well to kids, stores will still probably keep a SMALL selection of adult collectibles for tradition or impulse shoppers, collectors will get what they want, toy companies make money, and the industry runs a WHOLE lot smoother!
<P>
Now, on your point that you don't think Hasbro and Mattel could sustain their business?  Uuummm . . . no, I think they'd be fine.  Because we're not talking about ALL toys, we're talking about adult action figures.  Nerf, Hot Wheels, Barbie, Imaginext, Playschool, board games, and basically every 5-12 action figure line (like Jurassic World and Titan Heroes and those cheap 5-POA superheroes, etc) would still be at retail and keep them well afloat.  Financially, Hasbro and Mattel could DEFINITELY take their adult-targeted lines straight to customers for produce-on-demand, and they'd do fine.
<P>
Now . . . whether they can MANAGE direct online sales, I got two words for you! "Digital River." *LMAO* So . . . as they say, your mileage may vary!

Very insightful post. I would argue the Hasbro's and Walmarts are beholden to the Targets and Walmarts not because of action figures but because of the other things you mention which is where they make most their money. Hasbro and Mattel couldnt survive on action figures alone no matter what and they have to ensure Walmart and Target keep carrying the Nerf and other things made for the kids. Its really unclear why NECA needs to get in bed with Target and Walmart though I suspect its the only way they can get big licenses like TMNT. If NECA could sell that stuff at Walmart and Target, NIckelodeon probably wouldn't let them do what they do. I firmly believe the main reason McFarlane got DC over NECA is because NECA already had a strong presence (or at least stronger presence than NECA) at Walmart and Target.

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5 hours ago, JayC said:

Very insightful post. I would argue the Hasbro's and Walmarts are beholden to the Targets and Walmarts not because of action figures but because of the other things you mention which is where they make most their money. Hasbro and Mattel couldnt survive on action figures alone no matter what and they have to ensure Walmart and Target keep carrying the Nerf and other things made for the kids. Its really unclear why NECA needs to get in bed with Target and Walmart though I suspect its the only way they can get big licenses like TMNT. If NECA could sell that stuff at Walmart and Target, NIckelodeon probably wouldn't let them do what they do. I firmly believe the main reason McFarlane got DC over NECA is because NECA already had a strong presence (or at least stronger presence than NECA) at Walmart and Target.

Well yeah, but that's the thing, they really DON'T "have" to ensure that the stores keep selling the other stuff, because all that other stuff ACTUALLY sells and makes Walmart and Target money.  You're absolutely right, Hasbro and Mattel couldn't survive on action figures alone, not at ALL.  But that's not a risk, because the retailers DO WANT to sell toys.  Just not OUR toys.
<P>
The influence retailers hold over toy companies is mostly "we tell you how much of what things we'll stock, and what prices we sell them at, and you're gonna do what we say or else." Yes, this is a pressure on toy companies (usually, mass retailers severely underbid the manufacturer's initial requested cost, under the "but we buy in bulk, so you have to cut us a deal, you'll still make money" justification), but it balances out because toy companies know what kids want, and the retailers rely on that marketing info and play expertise.  Symbiotic give-and-take.  You market research, you make product, we decide price and availability, we both make money.
<P>
Problem is, that market research has told the retailers that action figures are such a low value, the retail investment isn't worth it, and figures become the black sheep in the toy section.  Now the retailer's influence is driven not by "what we WANT to carry," but instead "we DON'T want to carry this."
<P>
This mentality manifests as stores only carrying the lines of properties that are popular RIGHT NOW - and you watch, Fortnite is huge right now, but as soon as it dies down, you won't be able to find the figures anywhere in stores; same reason why the stores over-order the MCU Marvel Legends waves, and never seem to have the comic-based figures - or the stores only carry the kids' versions of toy lines of those properties with proven staying power over decades, like comics, Star Wars, dinosaurs, Ninja Turtles, Transformers, and pro wrestling.  That's why it's so much easier to find the cheap 5-POA Marvel cartoon figures and the Titans Heroes figures than it is to find Marvel Legends.  Because "action figures are for kids."  And staying power . . . know why Thundercats keep failing?  It wasn't the low ratings, it's because crappy marketing, so retailers don't GAF about the toys and don't stock them and the brand doesn't make any of that sweet merch money. (Didn't help that the toys were GARBAGE, WHY OH WHY did those idiots go with Bandai??)  Same reason Mattel took so long getting He-Man back into stores: they got burned on the 2002 series because stores notoriously didn't stock enough of the figures 'cuz they didn't believe in the staying power, and it became a self-fulfilling prophesy.  The show didn't make enough, and Mattel turned MOTU into a direct-to-consumer brand for a decade.
<P>
But that right there, MOTU Classics, THAT is your proof: the retailers aren't going to shun toy companies that decide to sell their adult collector lines direct to consumer.  Mattel took He-Man direct to customers, and Walmart's didn't just suddenly drop Barbie off the shelves.  Penalizing the toy companies by not carrying their OTHER products would be shooting THEMSELVES in the foot.  They DO make a good profit off of toys, and the main reason for it is the same reason that retail clothes shopping is still preferable to online: like clothes, parents prefer to buy their kids toys in person rather than online, because they can evaluate safety and appropriateness and child-approval better in person.  So the retailers do WANT to carry toys.  Just not the toys WE like.
<P>
So, if Mattel and Hasbro wanted to sell elsewhere and not provide action figures to the retailers at all?  The retailers wouldn't see it as "you're not playing nice with us, so we're not going to sell ANY of your toys."  That would be foolish and would lose them sales.  They'd be more likely to say "oh, so you're not asking us to grudgingly carry your limited market stuff?  Great!  More room for your stuff we ACTUALLY want, or maybe an extra aisle of sporting goods!"
<P>
The problem with all the toy companies (and this touches directly on the NECA point you made) is one of perception and tradition.  Selling at retail is just how it's ALWAYS BEEN DONE.  They know you CAN sell online, they know you CAN market directly to collectors . . . but it just doesn't mesh with the traditional retail worldview.  "This is how we do things, this is the way it works.  People go to stores and buy things, people like IRL brick-and-mortar shopping more than online."  And while that's true in the "instant gratification, I buy it now and have it now" sense, and in the "evaluate in person" scenario I mentioned above, while it's true retail is what old-school businesses THINK is the most profitable way to go . . . .
<P>
. . . Well, there's a reason Jeff Bezos is almost the world's first trillionaire.  *LOL*
<P>
It takes time to adapt to new shopping methods, and for a big toy company, it takes a LOT of time and effort and risk.  They're USED to selling in retail, their industry is CENTERED on selling in stores . . . and yes, because they DO have to work with Walmart and Target to sell all their other toys, they will always have to maintain that tradition to some extent.  But they've kinda been brainwashed over decades into thinking it's the ONLY (or at least, the very best) way to do things,  and they either can't wrap their head around the online-only concept (even if it's JUST for adult collectible figures), or they simply don't want to put in the effort towards doing both.
<P>
And that's probably NECA's main reason for still working with Walmart and Target.  License acquisition may be a SMALL part of it, but NECA is actually a MUCH bigger company than a lot of people realize and give them credit for.  They keep a low profile, but these guys own WizKids, KidRobot, and . . . ChiaPet (for some odd @#$%ing reason? *LMAO*).  They do have the influence and industry respect to get licenses.
<P>
What they DON'T have is the shipping infrastructure, and this is the primary complaint that everyone has with NECA TMNT that is ACTUALLY 100% justified and on them.  All the other problems are caused by Playmates or the retailers, but THIS . . . NECA ships, not through retailer warehouse systems, not in big bulk pallets filled with large cases sent on retail tractor trailer trucks to every store in the country . . . no, NECA ships by friggin' FedEx, in small quantities.  They either ship to the individual stores (which is inconvenient, because they don't go through the warehouse, they go through the front desk, and the employees don't stock them, outside NECA rep "ambassadors" are supposed to do it), OR they ship directly to their Ambassadors, who bring the merch in and put it on the shelves.  I HAVE NO EARTHLY IDEA WHY NECA DOES IT THIS WAY.  *LOL* My theory is that NECA is used to dealing with specialty stores and small businesses (Toys R Us, bookstores, video/music stores like FYE and Suncoast, GameStops, and comic shops), and those stores (with the exception of TRU) always tended to be in malls or they were privately owned, so they didn't GET trucks, they got individual deliveries . . . again, tradition, this is just how NECA has always done things.
<P>
And now that ALL of their traditional market stores are dried up (TRU and comic shops, obviously, and the book/movie/music/videogame stores are falling like dominos) the only retail options they have left are mega-corps.  And with mega-corps, and the fact that TMNT is a MUCH more popular property than most of their other stuff . . . the old system just ain't gonna fly.  And you're right, the old system ABSOLUTELY could never sustain the DC license.  As it stands, they either need to adapt to traditional mass-retail warehouse system bulk-shipping, or they need to find a new way to sell directly to customers.  And I'm so glad they're going with the latter!
<P>
As for why McFarlane got the DC license? Nah, that's a mystery for the ages, man.  Because a lot of those figures SUCK!! *LMAO*
<P>
. . . Man, I keep writing thesis statements, don't I? *LOL*  Sorry for the extra-long posts.

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The PixelDan interview with Randy from NECA covers some interesting points of them doing the online thing as well as about walmart/target involvement. If you havent watched/listened to it, its pretty good. 

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3 hours ago, EvilHayato said:

The PixelDan interview with Randy from NECA covers some interesting points of them doing the online thing as well as about walmart/target involvement. If you havent watched/listened to it, its pretty good. 

I did and Randy explained a lot of things we didn't know...

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This is a step in the right direction on NECA's part, it should at the very least help the situation. The figures themselves look really nice but they cost more than I'm willing to pay for them. They are not exactly my favorite antagonists in the movies. 

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Put my preorder in a minute after they went up. I was very excited to be able to nab them with no hassle! This is how things should be. Now I just need to find a way to get super shredder and my movie turtle collection will be complete! 

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16 hours ago, Belmont13 said:

This is a step in the right direction on NECA's part, it should at the very least help the situation. The figures themselves look really nice but they cost more than I'm willing to pay for them. They are not exactly my favorite antagonists in the movies. 

Ive wanted figures of these guys that fit what they looked like since I was a kid playing with the shitty playmates versions. For whatever reason, I was always very attached to these characters in the movie. Maybe its the mutants being live action (even tho they look alittle cartoony) but as an adult, these things hit the nostalgia and love for the movies so hard, its hard not to want them. Also they are apparently really large(and expensive), that they couldnt sell them in stores. So im cool with the price tag. 

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