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Is there such a thing as too old??


Lady Jaye
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I don't know DB, bro I've seen several "I think I want to quit" replies or threads from you in the past!! 0_o

 

(lol) I know I know...that's why I said I've struggled with it in recent years. But then I got over it. I though, "Ahh...what the heck. Who cares what I collect as long as I pay my bills and I'm not neglecting my responsibilities?" I think it's healthy when you have a hobby you enjoy and have a passion for. It's comforting to me actually, to cherish and preserve things that are familiar and/or cool. And it's just plain ol' fun, pure and simple.

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I've slowed down on collecting due to the economy and bad prices, but I don't think I will quit anytime soon.

 

Sh*t even if I were to become a playboy billionaire I would still probably collect figures. It is not like whatever pornstar I date as a billionaire will give a sh*t, because I'm still a freaking playboy billionaire.

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I've slowed down on collecting due to the economy and bad prices, but I don't think I will quit anytime soon.

 

Sh*t even if I were to become a playboy billionaire I would still probably collect figures. It is not like whatever pornstar I date as a billionaire will give a sh*t, because I'm still a freaking playboy billionaire.

LOL but like all pornstars she's just in it for the money

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I've slowed down on collecting due to the economy and bad prices, but I don't think I will quit anytime soon.

 

 

I have become very picky about what I want now....Years ago I would be buying up figures like Star Wars but now I always wait for something worthwhile to spend money on and lose out on other things

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I've slowed down on collecting due to the economy and bad prices, but I don't think I will quit anytime soon.

 

 

I have become very picky about what I want now....Years ago I would be buying up figures like Star Wars but now I always wait for something worthwhile to spend money on and lose out on other things

 

That's exactly where I'm at too Wheeljack.

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I think I'll continue collecting until something else comes along that fulfills the same function. Which may or may not ever happen. Whenever this issue comes up I always think of a book I read called "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain". The author made the argument that as we grow older we're increasingly indoctrinated into a world that's largely focused on left-brained function. A practical example she used was asking a child if they can sing, or draw, or dance. A lot of children will say "yes" with little hesitation because to them the world is still a large and new place. They simply haven't learned to define things as narrowly as an adult. Adults, by contrast, will say "no" to the questions because as we grow older we're taught to define ourselves and our world in terms that are much narrower and much more concrete. While this phenomenon does have certain pragmatic virtues, it's also very stifling.

 

For me, the real value of the things we all love isn't monetary, it's the chance to feel the same sort of right-brained sense of optimism and self-possession that I felt as a child before I had to adapt to a very cold and impersonal world. We live in a time that's increasingly more focused on labels and numbers than anything else. I've always loved Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" because it illustrates a very similar truth. Life isn't defined solely by simplistic quantitative measures that appeal to our linear reasoning, it's also defined by the qualitative aspects that appeal to our abstract reasoning. The things I collect don't just represent fictional characters, they also represent ideas and ideals, and memories of how I used to view and experience the world. I could probably go on for days about the benefits of stimulating the right side of the brain. When I was going through public school I had a few teachers along the way who pointed out that participation in the arts usually had a generalized affect on a student's grades across the board. I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out that there's a link between the decline of the action figure market in favor of video games, and the current decline in scores on achievement tests nationwide. I think there's an argument to be made for the benefits of toys which encourage abstract reasoning in terms of the positive impact on cognitive development.

 

I guess these things just provide a type of cognitive stimulation in a way that few other things do.

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Wow...that's an amazing perspective WS. You seem to accurately explain some things I can't seem to properly articulate. You've hit the proverbial nail on the head my friend, and you make some really great points. I've often defined my collecting as almost an extension or expression of my personality, my creativity, and ideals or concepts that speak to some part of me internally. I guess we just don't always stop and think about how our collections say something about who we are, but they do. Great food for thought WS...

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Thanks man. I just can't help but pick this stuff apart in my head. I've always been fascinated by human behavior and there's so much of it that's so hard to explain at times. I think at the center of it all we're all just wrestling with our existential issues in our own way. It's always nice to know that other people think about the same things the same way.

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I think I'll continue collecting until something else comes along that fulfills the same function. Which may or may not ever happen. Whenever this issue comes up I always think of a book I read called "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain". The author made the argument that as we grow older we're increasingly indoctrinated into a world that's largely focused on left-brained function. A practical example she used was asking a child if they can sing, or draw, or dance. A lot of children will say "yes" with little hesitation because to them the world is still a large and new place. They simply haven't learned to define things as narrowly as an adult. Adults, by contrast, will say "no" to the questions because as we grow older we're taught to define ourselves and our world in terms that are much narrower and much more concrete. While this phenomenon does have certain pragmatic virtues, it's also very stifling.

 

For me, the real value of the things we all love isn't monetary, it's the chance to feel the same sort of right-brained sense of optimism and self-possession that I felt as a child before I had to adapt to a very cold and impersonal world. We live in a time that's increasingly more focused on labels and numbers than anything else. I've always loved Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" because it illustrates a very similar truth. Life isn't defined solely by simplistic quantitative measures that appeal to our linear reasoning, it's also defined by the qualitative aspects that appeal to our abstract reasoning. The things I collect don't just represent fictional characters, they also represent ideas and ideals, and memories of how I used to view and experience the world. I could probably go on for days about the benefits of stimulating the right side of the brain. When I was going through public school I had a few teachers along the way who pointed out that participation in the arts usually had a generalized affect on a student's grades across the board. I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out that there's a link between the decline of the action figure market in favor of video games, and the current decline in scores on achievement tests nationwide. I think there's an argument to be made for the benefits of toys which encourage abstract reasoning in terms of the positive impact on cognitive development.

 

I guess these things just provide a type of cognitive stimulation in a way that few other things do.

 

 

Agree on all points. I have tried to explain my toy collecting to my wife at times. To me it represents my youth, a period of innocence and enthusiam about life that I have lost as an adult. As a kid there wasnt much better in life than waking up early and having a big bowl of sugary cereal, and watching saturday morning cartoons. Then follow that up with an afternoon of playing with toys, without a care in the world.

 

As an adult my mind is never that free, but going to the store and buying toys is me trying to imulate that innocence and freedom. I can say I have thought about quitting before. You cant take this stuff with you, and when you have THOUSANDS of figures. You cant really thibk that your loved ones are going to go through the trouble of identifying each figure. We all will like have to face the fact that the masterpiece prime(or whatever) we paid $250 for, will be sold on ebay/crag list/garage sale for $15 some day.

 

Its the same with video games....I just picked up skyward sword and Mario 3DS, but it will still not be the same experience as when I first played them on NES. Back in the day I would read the instruction book cover to cover, and stare at the back of boxes...now I dont do any of that.

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I may have said this before buttt when I was a young lad I bought some very good toyz I bought some very good toyz, i purchased them with fake ID, my name was Brian McGee, I stayed up listening to Queen.....point being I still haven't learned any lessons from mah youth, and I don't intend to, as long as that jones boy across the road keeps getting all the SDCC exclusives I'm going to buy all the little plastic men and robots that my big fat heart desires......I plan to die an 80 year old hoarder whose towering stacks of 25th ann. GI Joe re-issues squeezes the life outta mah tired bones after tumbling down on me. My last words will ironically be "help i've fallen and I can't get up" and prolly "at least I got em all on clearance", so spending all mah moneys on toyz and not an account with life-alert will ultimately be my demise.....and I'm okay with that, I've left a note in case of my passing, my nieces and nephews get my guitar collection and my favorite niece gets my cool toyz but the rest go to toyzfortots that need alot of bitchin toyz........

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Agree on all points. I have tried to explain my toy collecting to my wife at times. To me it represents my youth, a period of innocence and enthusiam about life that I have lost as an adult. As a kid there wasnt much better in life than waking up early and having a big bowl of sugary cereal, and watching saturday morning cartoons. Then follow that up with an afternoon of playing with toys, without a care in the world.

 

As an adult my mind is never that free, but going to the store and buying toys is me trying to imulate that innocence and freedom. I can say I have thought about quitting before. You cant take this stuff with you, and when you have THOUSANDS of figures. You cant really thibk that your loved ones are going to go through the trouble of identifying each figure. We all will like have to face the fact that the masterpiece prime(or whatever) we paid $250 for, will be sold on ebay/crag list/garage sale for $15 some day.

 

Its the same with video games....I just picked up skyward sword and Mario 3DS, but it will still not be the same experience as when I first played them on NES. Back in the day I would read the instruction book cover to cover, and stare at the back of boxes...now I dont do any of that.

 

I think maybe it's just a form of compartmentalization that guys are prone to. I think that's why Batman is so popular, honestly. That whole Dark Knight/Bruce Wayne duality is basically the quintessential man. I remember being so full of hope and confidence as a kid. The outside world was like a playground offering all kinds of new experiences. When I got older, around the time I was in middle school, I used to play football after school with a bunch of guys from my neighborhood. There was a public park on the next street over that had a path leading off of it to a clearing in the woods that served as an all-purpose sports field. They kept the grass cared for and there was a little shelter off to the side with a couple of picnic tables under it. It was kind of private because most people were at the main playground with their kids. We had a blast playing there until the day when some guy was killed in the parking lot during a robbery attempt. After that we started playing at our old elementary school a little farther down the street in the opposite direction. The grassy field there was in plain view of all the houses that surrounded it and there was always bound to be somebody's parents around.

 

I think facing the reality of the world we live in is tough to balance with the need to be the children we once were, and the adults they were supposed to grow up to be. It's like one day you wake up to see a stranger in the mirror you never would have recognized as a child, and the ideas we embrace through our hobby are the faint echoes of what we've lost, or at least what we have to hide from time to time. It's one of the last vestiges of innocence we have left to hold on to.

 

I stopped collecting for a little while when I first enlisted. It was a bit of a tumultuous transitional period and I wanted to keep my life as simple and as minimal as possible for the time being. Eventually I started again though, I was so frustrated with the environment that it helped to have Spawn figures around as a reflection of the anger I felt, and GI Joes to remind me that perseverance is perhaps the soldier's greatest virtue. Of course, seeing so many people come and go because they couldn't hack the lifestyle, especially during my first two years, was pretty motivating too. I think having little plastic representations staring back at you just makes it more real somehow.

 

It's hard to find untroubled quiet time, though I found it became a little easier after I separated from the military. I hope you'll be able to find the same at some point.

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I love that phrase you use "untroubled quiet time" because that's what a lot of people have failed to mention here.The ambiance that goes with this hobby(in my case anyways)is an undoubtedly quiet and relaxed one.It's the best of both worlds actually.The peace and tranquility i search for as an adult is attained by doing something that i loved to do as a kid.

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Im 32, got 2 little girls (who will have this Batman collection) they both love Superheroes so i am grateful for that. I have slowed down as the price of the action figs raised. I have turned to statues because they have a bigger ROI and come out once a quarter or so. but i still snag all things Batman when i see it and the funny thing is so does my friends and family for me...so i see myself collecting for awhile.

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I'm 40yrs old & drowned my children to get the insurance money to feed my toy habbit. LOL. Wow I guess I'm more effed in the head than I 1st thought to make such a tastless joke. Ok, all B.S. aside, I'm 30+ & gay as blazes. I don't have kids & thankfully never will (crumb snatchers). I have a $400.00 per month habit & a collection that's in the neigborhood of 40K.

 

I AM POWERFUL!

 

I get what I want. I don't ponder death because I will never die! But tell me Lady....what do YOU really want???? I mean I've been reading your "I'M DONE WITH IT ALL" post for quite some time now. What is it that you really want? You just seem like a woman....unsatified......you know, like toys are a selfish lover that got you half way there & then suddenly got up & split.

 

Sweetheart, $$$$ can always be found. If its something you really want, then make it happen. Don't waste time trying to gauge others "quit factor" so that you don't feel quite so left out not collecting.

 

If you want it....get it! Simple as that.

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I think I'll continue collecting until something else comes along that fulfills the same function. Which may or may not ever happen. Whenever this issue comes up I always think of a book I read called "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain". The author made the argument that as we grow older we're increasingly indoctrinated into a world that's largely focused on left-brained function. A practical example she used was asking a child if they can sing, or draw, or dance. A lot of children will say "yes" with little hesitation because to them the world is still a large and new place. They simply haven't learned to define things as narrowly as an adult. Adults, by contrast, will say "no" to the questions because as we grow older we're taught to define ourselves and our world in terms that are much narrower and much more concrete. While this phenomenon does have certain pragmatic virtues, it's also very stifling.

 

For me, the real value of the things we all love isn't monetary, it's the chance to feel the same sort of right-brained sense of optimism and self-possession that I felt as a child before I had to adapt to a very cold and impersonal world. We live in a time that's increasingly more focused on labels and numbers than anything else. I've always loved Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" because it illustrates a very similar truth. Life isn't defined solely by simplistic quantitative measures that appeal to our linear reasoning, it's also defined by the qualitative aspects that appeal to our abstract reasoning. The things I collect don't just represent fictional characters, they also represent ideas and ideals, and memories of how I used to view and experience the world. I could probably go on for days about the benefits of stimulating the right side of the brain. When I was going through public school I had a few teachers along the way who pointed out that participation in the arts usually had a generalized affect on a student's grades across the board. I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out that there's a link between the decline of the action figure market in favor of video games, and the current decline in scores on achievement tests nationwide. I think there's an argument to be made for the benefits of toys which encourage abstract reasoning in terms of the positive impact on cognitive development.

 

I guess these things just provide a type of cognitive stimulation in a way that few other things do.

Or the more simplistic point of view:

 

"Me like toys...me see toys...me buy toys...Me collect toys!"

 

Nuf said!

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  • 10 months later...

NEVER too old! I've been collecting off an on my whole life. Even when it wasn't considered cool when I was a teen. I was said that I'd rather play with toys or "dolls" as male friends or family members would call my figures than talk to girls. It was really quite the opposite. I always had a few girlfriends that I wasnt always sexually active with. It was a take it or leave it thing with me. Not peer pressure. Collecting never had nor has any affect on my social life or relationships. I'm 41 now and collecting pretty strong. It's just that money is a little tighter with a kid in college. But hey it's a love of mine and part of the reason I'm still sane with the ups and downs and losses I've had the past few years. Customizing has really helped too.

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