Jump to content

And it begins!


Lady Jaye
 Share

Recommended Posts

While browsing for deals in the action figure aisle in Wal Mart, I stopped by the DCUC pegs, and saw they had nothing but really old product. Which in of itself is not usual, but then I glanced at the price point, there it was; 14.97 a friggin figure!! Yup, you read that right, one Wal Mart in central Austin has DCUC priced at the new price point! @hmmm@

 

I'm glad I gave up on this line! I came across Wave 10 last night, and was seriously tempted.I'm glad I went to another Wal Mart today, cause it proves that I made the right decision, this line and toys in general are just too damn expensive. I'll stick with what I can find at a good deal.

 

 

So anyone else seen the new price point yet??

 

Well good luck guys, while many of us have good jobs, in this economy, spending that much on one toy, well it's a bit much. But 7 or 8 in one fell swoop, well like I said, good luck! Oh and don't forget to pick up MOTU figs at 20 plus shipping, Marvel U at 9 bucks plus tax, and finally Star Wars at 7 something. @smilepunch@

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Eh, they have been 13.99 around my way for a bit. I don't mind paying it as they are a quality line. I have paid more for Marvel Legends only because they were so darned hard to find... Heck it's $9.50 just to go to the movies here (although I don't frequent for that reason) I can fork it over for a quality DCUC Figure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Everything gets more expensive. It's a basic rule of production. Costs of materials increase as the original source materials (in this case oil for the making of plastic) become more demanded. Not only that but how much was a GI Joe Skystriker in 1983? Actual retail price? $14.99 The current Nightraven is of course more than double. The USS Flagg retailed for $109.99 and the Pitt, much smaller and without all the gimmicks runs for $99.99 today. Cost goes up. Bemoan it all you like. Blame Mattel. Blame OPEC. Blame whomever you like but it's reality. Here's something interesting. In 1910, one hundred years ago, a loaf of bread cost you $.03 and media income was $687.00 Today, a loaf of bread will run you $1.79 for the store brand (Acme brand in southeastern PA) and the median income is $34,926. By the way, this salary information comes from the US Census Bureau. Bread is nearly 60 times more expensive in 100 years. The median income is only 50 times greater. Are you going to stop buying bread? Prices go up. Your income will never match the rate of inflation. And if you don't like it. Don't buy it.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am glad I got Wave 11 before my Wal Marts price went up, but I would pay even if it had went up. People paid $15 each from MattyCollector and they were happy to do it, so as long as it stays at $15 or under, I will keep buying them. Right now, out of everything I collect (and thats alot) this is my favorite line, so like I said, I will definately keep buying them. My 2nd favorite is the Blackest Night line.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So it really is official. They warned us some time ago that this would happen with Wave 11, I guess we all forgot. :P

 

Now, there's no reason to buy figs outside of Matty Collector. Online, SHIPPED, cheaper than retail? I'll take a subscription, please.

 

Cheaper than retail?

 

14.97 per fig at retail

 

120.00 / 8 = 15. Plus shipping.

 

Both charge tax.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

El Kabong, thanks for bringing up the oil aspect. That's what I was going to mention. That is the real reason for price increases. Oil is a finite resource and some experts say we've hit peak oil already, some say a decade ago. Deniers pretend there is no such thing and we'll have oil forever. It's true we may still be using oil for a couple hundred years but the truth is we are running out gradually. Prices of anything that is connected to oil (nearly everything) will rise. This is why things such as carbon taxes are a good thing. Anyone who can afford it can still keep buying. Everyone else must stop since it is just material items. What needs to be done is for most material things to be made of something else besides plastic. The good old days of using whatever you want and not caring where it came from or what impact it has is over.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It doesn't really bother me that much since Mattel doesn't really care about business outside United States. The only place carrying DCUC in Canada is Toys R Us. THey are charging $19.99+tax per figure which will be very close to the cost of ordering online. I rather order online and get my figures faster.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The oil excuse is a huge giant red herring. The oil mini-crisis of two years ago was a big blank check for every provider of goods and services to jack up their prices, charge whatever they want, and hide behind the old "Well when the price of oil goes up, the price of everything goes up!" Well, last year when the price of oil plummeted, the price of NOTHING dropped. In fact, the price of nothing even stabilized. Everything kept rising and rising.

 

The REAL reason toy prices in particular are rising is evident in this thread alone. People are willing to pay these prices. Toy companies got whiffs of this on eBay and other secondary outlets. If a fan is willing to drop a hundred dollars on an Eradicator figure, why should the retailer and the manufacturer give that same figure away for ten bucks?

 

The interesting part is going to be where we go from here. It's very doubtful that this line is going to be sustainable at retail. I know everyone is seeing Wave 11 and 12 fly off the shelves now but it won't be long before everyone willing to drop fifteen bucks on DeSaad has one and this usually happens long before WalMart has ran through their stock. The end result is tons of DeSaads sitting on shelves for months. Then consider how fifteen dollar Zatanna's, Felix Fausts, and J'emm's will do at retail! All the while, Mattycollector is not only offering more convenience but it turns out a fairly comparable price point. I think we might see this line at retailer for another year. Maybe two. After that look for this to become available strictly online and once that happens the ceiling will be blown off the price. We'll look at twenty to twenty five bucks a figure.

 

The future ain't bright for this line. The only hope is that we can scratch up enough of our favorite characters during the next year or two.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So it really is official. They warned us some time ago that this would happen with Wave 11, I guess we all forgot. :P

 

Now, there's no reason to buy figs outside of Matty Collector. Online, SHIPPED, cheaper than retail? I'll take a subscription, please.

 

Cheaper than retail?

Yes.

 

My grand total: $128.70(after shipping.....tax?)

 

$128.70/8= about $16.09 per figure

 

$14.97 after tax= $16.19 per figure

 

Cheaper for me, ayway...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So it really is official. They warned us some time ago that this would happen with Wave 11, I guess we all forgot. :P

 

Now, there's no reason to buy figs outside of Matty Collector. Online, SHIPPED, cheaper than retail? I'll take a subscription, please.

 

Cheaper than retail?

Yes.

 

My grand total: $128.70(after shipping.....tax?)

 

$128.70/8= about $16.09 per figure

 

$14.97 after tax= $16.19 per figure

 

Cheaper for me, ayway...

 

$128.70 is after shipping, but before tax. I put two of those $60 figs on there (for $120). Plus $8.70 shipping. Plus $11.90 tax. GT = $140.60. It's actually pennies more than what Cornerstorecomics.com is charging (plus tax and ship) for a pre-order (so no reason to pre-order from them or BBTS anymore considering A) it's not that much of a price diff and B) I had to wait a LOT longer than those who ordered wave 11 from matty did).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The oil excuse is a huge giant red herring. The oil mini-crisis of two years ago was a big blank check for every provider of goods and services to jack up their prices, charge whatever they want, and hide behind the old "Well when the price of oil goes up, the price of everything goes up!" Well, last year when the price of oil plummeted, the price of NOTHING dropped. In fact, the price of nothing even stabilized. Everything kept rising and rising.

 

The REAL reason toy prices in particular are rising is evident in this thread alone. People are willing to pay these prices. Toy companies got whiffs of this on eBay and other secondary outlets. If a fan is willing to drop a hundred dollars on an Eradicator figure, why should the retailer and the manufacturer give that same figure away for ten bucks?

 

The interesting part is going to be where we go from here. It's very doubtful that this line is going to be sustainable at retail. I know everyone is seeing Wave 11 and 12 fly off the shelves now but it won't be long before everyone willing to drop fifteen bucks on DeSaad has one and this usually happens long before WalMart has ran through their stock. The end result is tons of DeSaads sitting on shelves for months. Then consider how fifteen dollar Zatanna's, Felix Fausts, and J'emm's will do at retail! All the while, Mattycollector is not only offering more convenience but it turns out a fairly comparable price point. I think we might see this line at retailer for another year. Maybe two. After that look for this to become available strictly online and once that happens the ceiling will be blown off the price. We'll look at twenty to twenty five bucks a figure.

 

The future ain't bright for this line. The only hope is that we can scratch up enough of our favorite characters during the next year or two.

 

I think you're missing something. True I'm sure the executives at Mattel, Hasbro, Jakks, Takara and every other toy company see how their products do in the secondary market. But I don't think that has anything to do with the rising cost of the final product. It really is the cost of the base materials.

 

1. Mattel outsources production costs to overseas manufacturers in southeast Asia. Think Taiwan, China, Singapore, Myanmar, etc. These production facilities bid on the manufacturing contracts. They do no care how a product sells on eBay. They try to make the lowest possible bid to win the contract. Much the same way our spaceshuttle has been built.

 

2. Once the product has been produced and packaged it is shipped overseas, via extremely large container vessel to ports in the USA, most likely Long Beach, CA. The shipping company is not a Mattel owned subsidiary but another third party who won the contract to ship the merchandise. They don't care how the merchandise sells on eBay either.

 

3. Now the product has reached the USA it is shipped to the various retail outlets nationwide. This is normally done via a common carrier like NA Van lines and in some cases through UPS, FedEx, or the good ole US Post office. Again, they don't care how the merchandise sells on eBay, ESPECIALLY the US government.

 

4. Finally the retailer receives the product and sets it out to sell. They factor everything into the final cost of the product, right down to the cost to light the store, the cost to clean the floor and the cost for the little pegs the product hangs on. They don't care how the merchandise sells on eBay either. Notice a trend?

 

The point I'm making is that no where in the entire life cycle of a DCUC 6" action figure does the eBay price get factored in. The only people other than the consumer who give a damn is the slaggin scalper who works for Target and nabs the new case before it hits the floor. What does matter are things like the salary of employees, their health insurance, the cost to run the factory, and the oil that goes into each and every step in the supply chain. Oil lubricates the machinery to run the production facilities. Oil is used as the fuel for the container vessel that ships the merchandise overseas and the fuel for the semis that get the product to the store. And oil is used indirectly by the stores that sell the product because they have to pay to heat and provide electricity with is often times generated by the burning of oil and other fossil fuels (coal and natural gas). And lets no forget plastic is made of petrochemicals, which is a fancy way of saying oil and gas.

 

I work for a global retailer that sees its products sold on eBay and at garage sales all over the country. There are 52 lines in the establishment of the final cost of a product and not one of them is the "what does this go for on eBay?" line. Simply put, the corporate world doesn't care about that.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The oil excuse is a huge giant red herring. The oil mini-crisis of two years ago was a big blank check for every provider of goods and services to jack up their prices, charge whatever they want, and hide behind the old "Well when the price of oil goes up, the price of everything goes up!" Well, last year when the price of oil plummeted, the price of NOTHING dropped. In fact, the price of nothing even stabilized. Everything kept rising and rising.

 

The REAL reason toy prices in particular are rising is evident in this thread alone. People are willing to pay these prices. Toy companies got whiffs of this on eBay and other secondary outlets. If a fan is willing to drop a hundred dollars on an Eradicator figure, why should the retailer and the manufacturer give that same figure away for ten bucks?

 

The interesting part is going to be where we go from here. It's very doubtful that this line is going to be sustainable at retail. I know everyone is seeing Wave 11 and 12 fly off the shelves now but it won't be long before everyone willing to drop fifteen bucks on DeSaad has one and this usually happens long before WalMart has ran through their stock. The end result is tons of DeSaads sitting on shelves for months. Then consider how fifteen dollar Zatanna's, Felix Fausts, and J'emm's will do at retail! All the while, Mattycollector is not only offering more convenience but it turns out a fairly comparable price point. I think we might see this line at retailer for another year. Maybe two. After that look for this to become available strictly online and once that happens the ceiling will be blown off the price. We'll look at twenty to twenty five bucks a figure.

 

The future ain't bright for this line. The only hope is that we can scratch up enough of our favorite characters during the next year or two.

 

I think you're missing something. True I'm sure the executives at Mattel, Hasbro, Jakks, Takara and every other toy company see how their products do in the secondary market. But I don't think that has anything to do with the rising cost of the final product. It really is the cost of the base materials.

 

1. Mattel outsources production costs to overseas manufacturers in southeast Asia. Think Taiwan, China, Singapore, Myanmar, etc. These production facilities bid on the manufacturing contracts. They do no care how a product sells on eBay. They try to make the lowest possible bid to win the contract. Much the same way our spaceshuttle has been built.

 

2. Once the product has been produced and packaged it is shipped overseas, via extremely large container vessel to ports in the USA, most likely Long Beach, CA. The shipping company is not a Mattel owned subsidiary but another third party who won the contract to ship the merchandise. They don't care how the merchandise sells on eBay either.

 

3. Now the product has reached the USA it is shipped to the various retail outlets nationwide. This is normally done via a common carrier like NA Van lines and in some cases through UPS, FedEx, or the good ole US Post office. Again, they don't care how the merchandise sells on eBay, ESPECIALLY the US government.

 

4. Finally the retailer receives the product and sets it out to sell. They factor everything into the final cost of the product, right down to the cost to light the store, the cost to clean the floor and the cost for the little pegs the product hangs on. They don't care how the merchandise sells on eBay either. Notice a trend?

 

The point I'm making is that no where in the entire life cycle of a DCUC 6" action figure does the eBay price get factored in. The only people other than the consumer who give a damn is the slaggin scalper who works for Target and nabs the new case before it hits the floor. What does matter are things like the salary of employees, their health insurance, the cost to run the factory, and the oil that goes into each and every step in the supply chain. Oil lubricates the machinery to run the production facilities. Oil is used as the fuel for the container vessel that ships the merchandise overseas and the fuel for the semis that get the product to the store. And oil is used indirectly by the stores that sell the product because they have to pay to heat and provide electricity with is often times generated by the burning of oil and other fossil fuels (coal and natural gas). And lets no forget plastic is made of petrochemicals, which is a fancy way of saying oil and gas.

 

I work for a global retailer that sees its products sold on eBay and at garage sales all over the country. There are 52 lines in the establishment of the final cost of a product and not one of them is the "what does this go for on eBay?" line. Simply put, the corporate world doesn't care about that.

 

 

There is nothing in this response that isn't addressed in my initial post. You thoroughly but unnecessarily outlined the path of a product from factory to retail but it does nothing to counter either of my two main points. To re-iterate and summize...

 

1. The price of oil, while initially a factor, is not the sole reason why prices continue to rise. Again, I point out that when oil not only stabilized but dropped, prices continued to increase. What was the justification then?

 

2. Manufacturers and retailers know what they can get away with charging for an item and they go for it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Find Action Figures on Ebay

×
×
  • Create New...
Sign Up For The TNI Newsletter And Have The News Delivered To You!


Entertainment News International (ENI) is the #1 popular culture network for adult fans all around the world.
Get the scoop on all the popular comics, games, movies, toys, and more every day!

Contact and Support

Advertising | Submit News | Contact ENI | Privacy Policy

©Entertainment News International - All images, trademarks, logos, video, brands and images used on this website are registered trademarks of their respective companies and owners. All Rights Reserved. Data has been shared for news reporting purposes only. All content sourced by fans, online websites, and or other fan community sources. Entertainment News International is not responsible for reporting errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and or other liablities related to news shared here. We do our best to keep tabs on infringements. If some of your content was shared by accident. Contact us about any infringements right away - CLICK HERE