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TheArticulatedOne

Is scalping wrong? An interview with two unrepentant ones.

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Part of collecting and visiting collecting message boards is hearing complaints about scalpers. Most collectors think they're some base level scum and a plague on the entire community. Many people paid exorbitant prices for a City Strike Snake Eyes before he was readily available thanks to the scalper market. But what does the scalper think about all this?

 

Find out with this review of two scalpers who do what they do without remorse. I'm curious what you think about it, so leave your comments here or on the interview. There's already some heated debate happening, so come contribute :)

 

Scalped! An Interview with the Enemy

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I hate these bastards...They go in take everything off the pegs and up the price online.Now to me that is wrong and I can't stand scalpers

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Scalpers, hoarders and army builders all make collecting a challenge. I can't say that I care for any of them or their methods. Fortunately I am usually able to find what I want in my area, but I am sure there are others who are affected by all three groups.

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You know what is so ludicrous about the argument against scalpers?

Its that there's no defined standard as to what constitutes scalping, and EVERY so-called standard amounts to a double-standard.

 

No? Don't think so?

 

 

-Buying more than one for resale? A lot of collectors do that and don't consider themselves or others to be scalping?

-Selling more than a 100% mark-up? Anyone who has a successful auction on Ebay that hawks an item 3, 4, 5 times the initial cost has just done that......and I seldom hear such folks called scalpers.

-Anyone who waits for a store to open? Anyone who seeks specific toys to buy even if they are not actually collecting them??

More than a few collectors do that as a matter of course--they do it because "the early bird gets the worm", and because they are buying stuff by proxy for other collectors.

Anyone who claims the scalper is some "selfish" jerk just in it for the money? Collecting is a selfish act to begin with, and anyone who has resold toys for ANY kind of mark-up, or on Ebay, with a aim for ANY degree of profit is using the same reasons.

Anyone who claims its all so UNFAIR??? ( and at the same time they have NO compunction about buying the last toy on the pegs. Heck they CROW about it!!)

 

The arguments against scalpers, basically amount to a petty, selfish grievance with contrived arbitrary rules that apply ONLY to toy purchases, but which mysteriously vanish or are ignored when it comes to other goods. Be honest with yourselves here folks; if you had a means to make extra money tapping into the desires of a dedicated clientèle--would you pass it up?

Toys are not the real issue here.

Its distorted perceptions of what is supposed to be fair, tied to a overwhelmingly immature emotional drive associated to a child's plaything. As adults we are introduced to many sophisticated (but simple) concepts such as life is NOT fair, and that first come is usually first served. If you do not like those concepts then you need to devise other means to circumvent others getting to the stuff before you, in order to ensure you get what you want.

The parallels run in MANY examples in our lives--but the one big one a lot of collectors ignore and lament is about the toys.

 

Hey, scalpers--like death and taxes--exist. You cannot do much about basic human greed and selfishness--pretty much because they are actually essential human drives. Trying to stamp them out in a social sense is insanity.

So you have to contend with it and overcome its influence upon you.

 

Complaining about scalpers has ZERO effect. Doing something about it, altering your habits to effect change creates POSSIBLE solutions that work to the degree of your preparation and perseverance.

The gripes against scalpers are old......they have been trod, and retreaded over and over again, ad neauseum. No-one has a solution that is realistic or practical.

All a discussion like this does is froth up the learned helplessness of the complainers, and has those same folks turn a deaf ear to solutions that could help them.

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pfft. i feel insulted when they say collectors get jealous. i mean yeah i get bumbed that someone gets a figure before me. i let it go. if a kid gets a figure that i want, i let him have it, better him (or her) than a scalper. - scalpers are and will remain a bane to collector's existance. business my ass, its bullshit is what it is.

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pfft. i feel insulted when they say collectors get jealous. i mean yeah i get bumbed that someone gets a figure before me. i let it go. if a kid gets a figure that i want, i let him have it, better him (or her) than a scalper. - scalpers are and will remain a bane to collector's existance. business my ass, its bullshit is what it is.

 

Well, anyone with common sense can see its not a business.

The guy says that "if he moves 10,000 items on his Ebay store, then its a job"--and he's full of it.

If that is his "business"--then why not get an actual retailers license, and get a legit connection to actual suppliers? If he's putting down stock for sale in the volume he likes to claim, then he's WASTING time and money raiding other stores for goods. It makes zero sense in terms of a business, and its a LOUSY way to run a business.

He's kidding himself when he thinks that.

 

As for jealousy...........semantics. I think a measure of envy, mixed with some contempt is there. Probably a bit of "grass is always greener..." in there too. But that is the same with anything where someone gets to it before you do, right?

At the end of the day, its just a product......just ANOTHER product, and it could be ANY product. If people are not fussy and bitching about missing out on the last DVD ( or whatever) on the shelf--then why do they do it when it comes to toys? Makes no sense to me.

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I still reserve the right to have a negative opinion towards those that would simply buy up an entire stock of a particular item, just to re-sell it later on eBay. They remove the chance of finding it for ourselves at retail and exploit the obsessive compulsions of the collectors to get that item no matter the PRICE.

 

Is it illegal? Of course not!

 

Do I hate it? Of course I do?

 

Do I have a little bit of a double-standard about it? Yes, I probably do, because i don't hold such a negative view towards army builders and customizers who buy mulitples for their collection displays or for customizing material. They lay down the expense to acquire them and they don't always make a profit on the backside of this expenditure, unless they SELL their customs later, which considering the cost put into making it and painting it, they've made a rare and unique piece that can't be found anywhere else.

 

Scalping for the mere purpose of creating demand for certain items, to make a profit off of the re-sell of them online is dirty business, and these kind of people suck. They don't particpate nor create, they just manipulate for a profit.

 

Again, I wouldn't cry about it being illegal, but I still reserve the right to make negative commentary on it's practice. ^_^

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Only with GI Joe figures have I ever had the opportunity to have "Army Builders", and even then I left a few on the pegs for others. The rest I got from internet retailers.

 

Toy scalpers are the lowest form of slime in the "legalized" form of business because they simply become the SECOND-MIDDLE-MAN. If retail stores like TRU, or Walmart and Target TRULY understood what this does to THEIR business, then they would restrict it as much as they could, even lobby to Congress about it.

Ya, I know what you are saying. "If all of their merchandise is sold, why should THEY care?" The answer is simple. If the consumer never needs to shop at your store for the product, then buying it over priced on-line is the only way left, there for they won't buy many other things at your store either,..because they just blew their money on something 3x more expensive at some scalper's e-bay page. Ya, you now have empty pegs (which also frustrates the consumer), but you keep crying about a lack of sales every year. STUPID. @loll@

 

Scalping is wrong. If I ever have the good fortune to meet a real action figure scalper, ...well let's just say dental records might not even identify the corpse. @firedevil@

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Ya, I know what you are saying. "If all of their merchandise is sold, why should THEY care?" The answer is simple. If the consumer never needs to shop at your store for the product, then buying it over priced on-line is the only way left, there for they won't buy many other things at your store either,..because they just blew their money on something 3x more expensive at some scalper's e-bay page. Ya, you now have empty pegs (which also frustrates the consumer), but you keep crying about a lack of sales every year. STUPID.

 

But really, they are not. They've made their sales, but those items sold are barely even a fraction of the overall volume of goods that move through a retailers store(s). Many retailers consider toys to be a loss-leader department anyway. I've read that Walmart only tried to trump TRU a few years ago because they were just competition, NOT because they sought more profit from selling toys. Walmart realized that TRU had a model that worked because all they sold were toys and baby items, and backed off because Walmart sells so many other kinds of goods, they cannot devote the floorspace needed to offer a similar amount of just toy goods.

Also, the toys we are talking about ( action figures) are even less of a consideration, because they have a dedicated audience that tends to not shop casually in the same store when they buy toys anyway. They go in, buy the toys and leave.

Action figures do NOT make up the bulk of toy sales--they are but a fraction.

 

So, really, secondary markets mean nothing to major retailers......the good being sold on secondary markets simply do not mean anything in hard numbers. If they had, retailers would have stepped into the equation years ago because scalping toys is NOT a new trend.

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Ya, I know what you are saying. "If all of their merchandise is sold, why should THEY care?" The answer is simple. If the consumer never needs to shop at your store for the product, then buying it over priced on-line is the only way left, there for they won't buy many other things at your store either,..because they just blew their money on something 3x more expensive at some scalper's e-bay page. Ya, you now have empty pegs (which also frustrates the consumer), but you keep crying about a lack of sales every year. STUPID.

 

But really, they are not. They've made their sales, but those items sold are barely even a fraction of the overall volume of goods that move through a retailers store(s). Many retailers consider toys to be a loss-leader department anyway. I've read that Walmart only tried to trump TRU a few years ago because they were just competition, NOT because they sought more profit from selling toys. Walmart realized that TRU had a model that worked because all they sold were toys and baby items, and backed off because Walmart sells so many other kinds of goods, they cannot devote the floorspace needed to offer a similar amount of just toy goods.

Also, the toys we are talking about ( action figures) are even less of a consideration, because they have a dedicated audience that tends to not shop casually in the same store when they buy toys anyway. They go in, buy the toys and leave.

Action figures do NOT make up the bulk of toy sales--they are but a fraction.

 

So, really, secondary markets mean nothing to major retailers......the good being sold on secondary markets simply do not mean anything in hard numbers. If they had, retailers would have stepped into the equation years ago because scalping toys is NOT a new trend.

Anyone can look at it that way, but action figures have been the fastest selling part of the toy section in any store. Action figures sell out far faster than any other toy other than sports equipment. It may be a fraction, but so is the whole toy department. The question becomes "How has this fraction benefitting our store? Do we get the full benefit, or is a group of scalpers hurting this section of sales by wiping us out so no one comes HERE to shop? "

And when it comes to Toys R Us, maybe we can compare just how many diapers they sell compared to Walmart, or Sam's, or any other retailer. They may sell baby stuff, but even Babies R Us can't justify sales compared to Walmart or your local grocery store. In other words -"Moms shop some place else for better prices. Period."

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Anyone can look at it that way, but action figures have been the fastest selling part of the toy section in any store. Action figures sell out far faster than any other toy other than sports equipment. It may be a fraction, but so is the whole toy department.

 

No.

They are not.

Video games and trend items like Bratz dolls outsell action figure by huge margins. Not only do they sell out faster, they are stocked in much greater depth.

 

How fast have the latest video games sold out? Modern warfare 2, Batman Arkham Asylum? The demand for those products is enormous.

 

What's the demand for action figures? Hey, its depends on who knows the characters.

 

The question becomes "How has this fraction benefitting our store? Do we get the full benefit, or is a group of scalpers hurting this section of sales by wiping us out so no one comes HERE to shop? "

 

Which action figure lines are selling out fast? Three......four, maybe five or six lines? How much shelf space does that comprise in the store. Go pick a store and look. Walk around the whole store. Go count the pegs for those lines, count how many cards fit on those pegs and do the math for the rough dollar figures. Then look around the store again and get a sense of just HOW LITTLE action figures matter.

The store will make more money selling three refrigerators ( or equally large ticket items) then it will selling ALL of the "hot" action figures it has in stock. No-one is going to give a rat's ass if the action figures are selling out.

 

 

 

And when it comes to Toys R Us, maybe we can compare just how many diapers they sell compared to Walmart, or Sam's, or any other retailer. They may sell baby stuff, but even Babies R Us can't justify sales compared to Walmart or your local grocery store. In other words -"Moms shop some place else for better prices. Period."

 

How much attention do you pay to Babies R Us outlets?

Any??

Probably not if you are like most collectors. Its doubtful you have even set foot in a Babies R Us, but parents with babies go to them just as much as they do to Walmart et al.

That's because they have selection, and product in stock. Don't dismiss that out of hand. Toy R Us would have never gotten into the specialty baby market if there was no money to be made at at it, and during the recent spate of recent TRU closures, it was more TRU stores WITHOUT Babies R US outlets attached that closed.

 

But its irrelevant to the topic at hand.

 

Action Figures are stocked at just the right amounts to justify the stock ordered--that is how the stores see it.

Hard to swallow, but the proof is on the pegs.

Those Legendary Comic Book Heroes, were ordered extensively by retailers like Walmart--they had a dedicated audience for them ( comic book readers), they were good, attractive-looking product.

 

They were so much shelf-glue that stores still have them on the pegs two years after they came out.

 

Oops.

 

Look at it how the stores see it: why risk over-ordering a "trendy" product that is consumed by a fickle audience? Why risk anything? Retailers are risk adverse about EVERYTHING, but if they sell out of something, they are happy. If the customers go wanting, hey, that's good, because they WILL come back to the store looking again, and odds are will buy something else if they cannot find what they want.

That's the fact of it.

 

So why should they care if there is a secondary market for action figures that they are not a part of??

They have ALREADY made the sale--and moved those goods. The secondary market is an equation completely outside of their interests or desires. They have no market in it, and the products being sold therein are beyond minuscule, in terms of dollar value.

They may as well try to shoe-horn into, and set up kiosks at, a swap meet or farmers market, if that were their aim.

 

Not likely to happen, eh?

 

See, ultimately, the argument against scalpers ends up being superfluous. They are ALWAYS going to prey upon the niche demographic, because that demographic attaches emotion to their purchasing habits--specifically with toys. The playing field with scalpers involved will NEVER be fair, or level--because they are not interested in fairness, only in attempting to profit. They mock the equally selfish reasons collectors use to justify why toys should be made more available, because those reasons are based on flawed perceptions.

The reasons are arbitrary, inconsistent and untenable, and made even worse by the emotional filter of nostalgia that collectors apply to their interests. They are NOT sound reasons for limiting the practise of scalping at a retail level.

 

So what do you do?

 

You spit out the bad taste in your mouth and you change your approach. You access the people in your local sphere and see if they can assist you in buying at a retail level. Make friends, patronize steadily to build trust and see if the retailer can help you.

If they cannot, you broaden the commercial sphere in which you shop--and accept that its going to cost a bit more to do so.

Seek out fellow collectors that can access stuff you have a hard time finding--but rapport and fellowship along the way.

Learn new things, learn ways to make your collecting more cost-effective ( tax write-offs) and above all: be patient and have fun.

 

If you balk at that, and declare that it "should" be fair for everyone, and you "should" be able to just walk into a store and buy what you like.......well, too bad. The world changed, and complaining about all the "should" in it will not make a difference.

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If I walked into walmart and saw something on the pegs I knew was worth money to some idiot online who would pay 10x the retail price for it I'd probably buy it and sell it.

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How much attention do you pay to Babies R Us outlets?

Any??

Probably not if you are like most collectors. Its doubtful you have even set foot in a Babies R Us, but parents with babies go to them just as much as they do to Walmart et al.

I worked at one long enough to know what I'm talking about. <_< ... and no, they can not compete with Walmart or their local grocery. People usually go there to get baby strollers and cribs. They sometimes have great sales on baby cloths, but like you said, this is another topic.

 

Video games are also another topic. Fortunately TRU sells those too.

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If I walked into walmart and saw something on the pegs I knew was worth money to some idiot online who would pay 10x the retail price for it I'd probably buy it and sell it.

Ya, but these scalpers hound toy forums like this and predict what is going to be hot, then wipe the shelves clean to guarantee collectors will be foaming at the mouth for the product. They create the shortage to make "rare" items.

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If I walked into walmart and saw something on the pegs I knew was worth money to some idiot online who would pay 10x the retail price for it I'd probably buy it and sell it.

 

I don't even bother with it.

 

I get more enjoyment out of finding something others are looking for and need help with, and just hooking them up for cost and shipping.

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Nothing but sound advice coming out of ARROW's corner. Honestly, It just boggles my mind how folk can waste their time complaining about scalpers. They will NEVER go away.

 

 

Never stated they would, but that doesn't change my opinion on them. Anything can be a waste of time to those who don't really care about it. I don't stay up nights, unable to sleep about toy scalpers, but when I pop in to check the discussions here and someone is posting a question about something I have an opinion on, well, there it is.

 

This place is dead enough as it is and it's probably because someone is always complaining about what others are talking about, and telling them to stop talking about it, because it offends them. Scalpers know what they do is shady and wrong, but like you said, they're not going to stop doing it just because some people feel that way about it, so what's wrong with a little negative reinforcement towards their business practices? Sort of like people that b!tch about Walmart.

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Scalping has become only a minor annoyance to me in recent years. Maybe it's partly due to the fact that I don't collect action figures as heavily as I used to, but it's really not an issue to me anymore. To be honest I can see both sides of the argument, although I don't necessarily agree with people who case stores (no pun intended) all hours of the day and night and buy up whole shipments of stuff strictly to make a profit. But really, at the end of the day, the worst that happens is I have a hole in my toy collection. So what? Annoying? Yes, of course it is, but there are worse things in life I guess. And if I just absolutely have to have a given toy or figure, I'll pay the mark-up online, as long as it's within reason of course. It's all in how high you're willing to go. If I'm lucky enough to find stuff before scalpers do, or before it sells out in general, then hooray for me. That's part of the fun of collecting, the thrill of the hunt. For example, a few weeks back, when I found the Red Fang Ninja/Night Adder/CS Duke wave, I was estatic. Never mind a week later it seemed that you could find them everywhere (lol), but it was fun for me. I felt like I had found the prize eggs so to speak. Maybe that's what we all lose sight of sometimes, the fun of collecting. When scalpers ruin the hobby for you, and it stresses you out, then it's not fun anymore and not worth it.

 

Just do like I do when I can; save up and buy figure cases online. I know everyone can't afford to do it, but it's well worth it if you're worried about packaging condition and completing a given wave or collection. Yeah, like I said, the thrill of the hunt is fun, but opening up a factory case of mint carded figures is even more fun. (lol) At least to me it is, since I can be so obsessive about mint cardbacks...

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Why Is Scalping Wrong?

copyright 1999 by Dave Van Domelen

 

For those who have no idea what I'm talking about, or think I refer to removing the top of someone's head, here's what I mean by scalping. Scalping is the practice of buying up a desirable commodity, such as tickets to an event or copies of a hard to find toy, and then selling it at inflated prices once the demand exceeds the supply that you helped deplete. Certain types of scalping are illegal in many states, mainly ticket scalping. However, in this piece I intend to address that rather scummy practice of toy scalping.

 

If you've ever tried to buy the latest "hot" toy, or even a less-popular and under-shipped part of a major line, you'll know it's often almost impossible. The shelves will be full of everything BUT what you're looking for.

Five hundred Line Dancing Attack Batman figures and no Batgirl. Dozens of Sammy Sosas but no Ken Griffey Jr. And so on. Then you happen to go into a comic shop or toy show or some place where toys are resold, and there on

the shelf is the toy you've checked fifteen stores for this afternoon! Except, while the toy would have been $6 at Wal-Mart, it's $24 here. Maybe you pay the $24, but if you don't, you may never get ahold of that toy. You

fume. How did these guys get it?

 

The answer is what Greg Hyland has dubbed "Toy Pirates." Toy Pirates may be scalpers themselves, or they may simply be the agents of scalpers, taking a percentage of the jacked-up price the scalper charges customers.

Toy Pirates are people who arrange their schedules and lives so that they can be at the toy store the moment the trucks come in. They wait in the aisles, or even on the docks (some Toy Pirates are store employees!) and as soon as

the boxes are opened, they snag all the toys that they think might be popular or hard to find. It there's only one in a box, they take it. If there's no short-packing (a practice of sending lower amounts of toys the company thinks

won't sell as well), then they take the biggest "names" in the box. By the time regular customers can get to the store after work or on the weekend, all that's left are the toys shipping ten to a box or the ones no one wants. Toy

companies do try to work around this, by shipping more of a character they think will be popular, but that just creates new scarcities in the toys that have to be short-packed to make room for the extra popular toys.

 

In short, there's no way a normal person who's in school or has a job can compete with the Toy Pirates, and all the "good stuff" ends up on the Scalper's shelves.

 

 

Now that I've explained the situation, you might be wondering what's so wrong? Well, in the grand scheme of things, not a whole lot. After all, the Toy Pirates aren't physically hurting anyone (usually...there have been

fistfights over the contents of boxes), and they don't even really cause that much emotional distress. Compared to other things Toy Pirates could be doing with their free time and lack of ethics, Toy Piracy is pretty small stuff.

But it's still bad. First, the obvious reasons. They're not playing fair. The kids who actually want to play with the toys have to pay sometimes ludicrous prices ($400 Furby, anyone?) or go without because some greedhead Toy Pirate blew half his month's pay on every cool toy in the store (and made it all back with extra, of course). It may be a lesser degree, but it's the same type of behavior that leads to profiteers selling bread for a hundred bucks a loaf in wartorn countries. War profiteers have been shot in the past. Toy Pirates and scalpers should at the very least be made uncomfortable. The behavior is reprehensible regardless of the degree, it's only a matter of how much we should despise those engaging in it.

 

The cycle feeds on itself. Anyone burned too often by scalpers will probably start playing the game as well. I've even found myself tempted to buy toys that I don't WANT simply because it's the first one of its type I've seen in weeks of looking, and I know it's somehow "valuable" as a result. Then I regain my senses and put the toy out front on a low peg so that a small kid can buy it (I hope). But beyond this, there's a profound bit of unpleasantness that scalping helps perpetuate. The idea that toys are not to be played with, that they are simple investments to be fought for, hoarded and resold to any sap clueless enough to pay the price.

 

TOYS ARE FOR PLAYING WITH.

 

It's a simple truth, and one I don't want to see scalpers bury. I'm 29

years old (as of this writing) and I buy toys to play with. If I didn't

intend to play with them (or trade them for toys I want to play with), I

wouldn't buy them. Sure, my "play" patterns are different from those of a 5

year old kid, and might often be considered "tinkering." But the point is

that I take the things out of their boxes and have fun with them. They

aren't just inventory, a column of dollar signs.

Scalpers debase the fundamental meaning of what a toy is. They corrupt

children into accepting this debased definition. They take a little piece of

what is GOOD about humanity and turn it into greed. And it is that tiny

darkening of our collective spirit, that deliberate act of banality and

venality, which is what is wrong with toy scalping.

 

So...being that it is a small evil, you can do a lot to fight it with

small bits of kindness and goodwill. If you see a toy that looks like

scalpers would be after it, try to find a kid in the store who would like it,

and hand it to him (ask any parent present, of course). If you find

something scalpable hidden behind racks or under piles, it's probably part of

a secret stash...not all Toy Pirates have bottomless wallets, and they often

try to hide stuff until their next payday. So take these neat toys, buy any

you plan to play with or give as gifts, and put the rest out in prominent

locations, to increase the chance that some kid or parent will buy it.

There's other, more extreme actions, but these tend to annoy the stores more

than they stop the scalpers, so I won't recommend them here. But do what you

can in small ways to foil the Toy Pirates. See a parent casting about

looking for something to buy the kids? Point out anything the Toy Pirates

haven't gotten to, explain how neat it is and how it'll just end up on a

scalper's wall for 300% markup otherwise. Stores like it when you help them

make sales to real customers. Real customers outnumber scalpers, after all,

and making things good for them is good for business (which many stores have

recognized with "limit N to a customer" policies).

Basically, if you can do something nice for a kid or a parent and also

sock it to a scalper, go for it. Keep toys in the hands of those who will

play with them!

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This place is dead enough as it is and it's probably because someone is always complaining about what others are talking about, and telling them to stop talking about it, because it offends them. Scalpers know what they do is shady and wrong, but like you said, they're not going to stop doing it just because some people feel that way about it, so what's wrong with a little negative reinforcement towards their business practices? Sort of like people that b!tch about Walmart.

 

As a topic, complaining about scalpers is just beating a dead horse. Its old because few discussions offer solutions, and even worse, most discussions revolve around the right to complain and people are not even interested in solutions!! As if their misery is a merit badge.

 

Hey, if people WANT to be miserable.....I'm all for it.

Give 'em what they want. I've reached a point in my own life where I think its complete, utter, absolute insanity to be miserable about something, especially when there's so many happy positive things to focus on.

I sure as heck do not want to arrive on my deathbed and think about all the crap I was privileged to put up with in life.

I'd rather focus on all the fun I had instead.

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So.... what i've learned from this is that Aarow is a sclaper? I mean seriously, you must've burned through 3 keyboards with how much you write.

 

Scalping is not illegal, it certainly is WRONG.

 

Scalper (def.): Someone who purchases (repeatedly) a highly sought after toy in the collecting community for the specific intention of re-selling to the collecting community.

 

THat's it, nothing to argue about. People who defend scalpers make me sick as well. I can't wait to find one in real life, so if any of you scalper or scalperlovers read this STAY OUT OF PHILADELPHIA!

regards

joshua

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This place is dead enough as it is and it's probably because someone is always complaining about what others are talking about, and telling them to stop talking about it, because it offends them. Scalpers know what they do is shady and wrong, but like you said, they're not going to stop doing it just because some people feel that way about it, so what's wrong with a little negative reinforcement towards their business practices? Sort of like people that b!tch about Walmart.

 

As a topic, complaining about scalpers is just beating a dead horse. Its old because few discussions offer solutions, and even worse, most discussions revolve around the right to complain and people are not even interested in solutions!! As if their misery is a merit badge.

 

Hey, if people WANT to be miserable.....I'm all for it.

Give 'em what they want. I've reached a point in my own life where I think its complete, utter, absolute insanity to be miserable about something, especially when there's so many happy positive things to focus on.

I sure as heck do not want to arrive on my deathbed and think about all the crap I was privileged to put up with in life.

I'd rather focus on all the fun I had instead.

 

Your error is in associating complaining with misery. I already made it clear that I don't lie awake at night (in misery) over the practice of toy scalpers. Not every complaint is going to, or even NEEDS to have a solution. We complain about the things we dislike and we praise the things we do like as a form of communication here. Most the praise, and especially the complaining, falls on deaf ears anyway and only the small community take note of who likes, or dislikes, what or who and that's just our little click of fans here. Even these so-called fan polls are bogus as far as directing or having an influence on anything within the toy lines were fans of.

 

Nobody WANTS to be miserable, but I'm sure many people are. That has nothing to do with discussions about toys, their makers, the retail chains that sell them, the online dealers or the scalpers that hoard them. People like to make points (maybe we've heard a couple hundred times before) and we can either offer an opinion or ignore it. Why discourage it, just because we're bored with it and think it's a dead horse of a topic?

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Just a quick question for everyone here. How much do you think scalping has affected your ability to find the toys you want? I know that there are quite a few people who fit the "scalper" definition in my area as I've been told about them by store employees and I've bumped into a couple of them by chance.

 

However, by and large, I'm still able find what I want without too much difficulty. Sometimes it might take a few months, but I've had no major problems overall. Granted, I collect mostly Transformers, but I do dabble in Star Wars, GI Joe, and Marvel/DCUC figures if I see something that looks cool. I've seen entire sets of DCUC wave 10 at Wal-Mart a couple of times, even though they are supposedly really "hot" at the moment. I even was able to snag a Joker and Power Girl in the middle of the day one time. Probably the only thing that is hard to find around my area is Star Wars figures, but those things have always been popular and the figures usually get re-released at some point, so no worries there.

 

With regards to the topic, scalping doesn't bother me. I laugh when I go to Frank & Sons and see some guy mark some action figures 300-500% up and still trying to hawk those same figures 3 months later at the same booth, but no one is buying at those prices.

 

PharmV

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I use to blame scalpers but now I just blame @can@ @loll@ LOL No I don't blame scalpers anymore I pretty much agree that it is first come first serve ... arrow is also right with many of his points there are people here on these forums that try to "scalp" stuff yet claim to hate "scalper" as well @loll@ People also call sellers fat all the damn time, I know quite afew people who sell stuff who could kick most o yall asses @loll@

 

Also the picture of the green lantern with the middle finger stuck to his chest cracks me right up! hahahh! the two guys answering the questions could have come off better though all there answers sound like they are giving you the middle finger. "we are right & you are wrong, so stick it!!" @loll@

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This place is dead enough as it is and it's probably because someone is always complaining about what others are talking about, and telling them to stop talking about it, because it offends them. Scalpers know what they do is shady and wrong, but like you said, they're not going to stop doing it just because some people feel that way about it, so what's wrong with a little negative reinforcement towards their business practices? Sort of like people that b!tch about Walmart.

 

As a topic, complaining about scalpers is just beating a dead horse. Its old because few discussions offer solutions, and even worse, most discussions revolve around the right to complain and people are not even interested in solutions!! As if their misery is a merit badge.

 

Hey, if people WANT to be miserable.....I'm all for it.

Give 'em what they want. I've reached a point in my own life where I think its complete, utter, absolute insanity to be miserable about something, especially when there's so many happy positive things to focus on.

I sure as heck do not want to arrive on my deathbed and think about all the crap I was privileged to put up with in life.

I'd rather focus on all the fun I had instead.

 

Your error is in associating complaining with misery. I already made it clear that I don't lie awake at night (in misery) over the practice of toy scalpers. Not every complaint is going to, or even NEEDS to have a solution. We complain about the things we dislike and we praise the things we do like as a form of communication here. Most the praise, and especially the complaining, falls on deaf ears anyway and only the small community take note of who likes, or dislikes, what or who and that's just our little click of fans here. Even these so-called fan polls are bogus as far as directing or having an influence on anything within the toy lines were fans of.

 

Nobody WANTS to be miserable, but I'm sure many people are. That has nothing to do with discussions about toys, their makers, the retail chains that sell them, the online dealers or the scalpers that hoard them. People like to make points (maybe we've heard a couple hundred times before) and we can either offer an opinion or ignore it. Why discourage it, just because we're bored with it and think it's a dead horse of a topic?

 

I agree. If there is at least one singular defining characteristic of a "fan" (of ANYTHING) it is complaining about it with other like minded individuals. I think Arrow's posts got to the "why" of complaining and those whys either can be or will devolve into something negative (which isn't exactly healthy).

 

I think for most of us it is a matter of "letting off steam" of some kind. This is a hobby and it is enjoyable to share that hobby with others (which is THE reason sites like this exist). Dead horse threads like these will always crop up and people will throw in their 2 cents, again, and the thread will die off, again.

 

As for the article itself, it is just and excuse by the "scalpers" to justify to themselves a practice that is generally considered wrong.

 

Just a quick question for everyone here. How much do you think scalping has affected your ability to find the toys you want?

 

If there is one thing I've learned, especially buying off ebay, is patience. Collectors tend to be an eager group to get the newest item(s) ASAP (which is why 25th single Storm Shadow went for $100 before it hit stores). Part of it is that delusional "bragging rights" that the true dorks feel it necessary to express. To whom? I'm not sure, but most likely to make themselves feel good.

 

But I digress. There have been very few items that I've missed a chance at getting (such as Masterpiece Starscream when it was Walmart). And even then if I REALLY have to have it, there is always the secondary market. And, again, there its a matter of patience...or deciding that said item really isn't that important to obtain.

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