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Limited Edition Savage Hulk


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the head looks like ass, the eyes are crossed and the grin looks weird. pass, pick it up when it goes down to 2.50 on clearance.

 

 

So you think it looks like total crap, but you're still going to buy it on clearance?

 

 

 

 

...weird.

 

what weird is people buying them on clearance period? Don't they realise that why the series is failing (well according to some.) if you can't pay the price then don't collect.

 

the thing is why doesn't hasbro make them decent in the first place, that might amend the situation.

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the head looks like ass, the eyes are crossed and the grin looks weird. pass, pick it up when it goes down to 2.50 on clearance.

 

 

So you think it looks like total crap, but you're still going to buy it on clearance?

 

 

 

 

...weird.

 

what weird is people buying them on clearance period? Don't they realise that why the series is failing (well according to some.) if you can't pay the price then don't collect.

 

the thing is why doesn't hasbro make them decent in the first place, that might amend the situation.

 

 

 

 

Apparently, people will buy them anyway.

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Does anyone know when this is coming out?

 

I suspect May 1st.

 

 

 

Well no time to petition. @loll@ I wish they would have used Face Off Hulk. Most of the figures I was going to hunt online for are coming out this fall. Which is the enormous Venom, Iron Spidey, and Green Goblin. And I am getting alot of stuff that was on my wish list this year like the bAda$$ Red Hulk, King Hulk, Grey Hulk, Black Bolt, Daredevil, Punisher, Beast, Silver Savage, Black Wolverine, Adam Warlock, Skrull Variants of figures, another Super Skrull, and Absorbing Man. So I am almost going to have a perfect year. Maybe some other time for Face Off Hulk.

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the head looks like ass, the eyes are crossed and the grin looks weird. pass, pick it up when it goes down to 2.50 on clearance.

 

 

So you think it looks like total crap, but you're still going to buy it on clearance?

 

 

 

 

...weird.

 

what weird is people buying them on clearance period? Don't they realise that why the series is failing (well according to some.) if you can't pay the price then don't collect.

Why are you shifting the blame onto the consumer? It's not anyone's job to keep the line afloat but Hasbro's. If it were to go under, it would be because they produced a product that didn't compell people to buy it. But really, what's worse for them? People buying their figures on clearance or people not buying them at all?
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The Title of this thread should state Limited Edition "UnSavage" Hulk. That facial sculpt looks like what he would look like after sitting on the pegs for a long, long, long time, and then ending up on a Clearance bin.

 

 

My idea of what a Limited Edition Exclusive Movie Hulk should resemble something out of the Movie, like so . . .

 

New-Hulk.jpg

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the head looks like ass, the eyes are crossed and the grin looks weird. pass, pick it up when it goes down to 2.50 on clearance.

 

 

So you think it looks like total crap, but you're still going to buy it on clearance?

 

 

 

 

...weird.

 

what weird is people buying them on clearance period? Don't they realise that why the series is failing (well according to some.) if you can't pay the price then don't collect.

 

So, in other words...Never, ever look for a bargain?? And if you do, you're somehow responsible for the line's potential demise???

 

That's ILLOGICAL.

 

By the time a figure is on the pegs, it's ALREADY been sold, and the manufacturer has ALREADY made their money. It makes no difference whether or not it sells at the SRP ("suggested retail price"), or a marked-down sale price.

 

And, even if it's sold at a discounted price, the retailer still makes money because the retail price is always marked-up from the wholesale price. In other words, what they buy for, say, $2.50 from HASBRO, they sell to you for $9.99 + tax. Even if it's on sales, they're still making a profit, and if the line is profitable, it'll keep being manufactured and sold to consumers.

 

#US1#

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the head looks like ass, the eyes are crossed and the grin looks weird. pass, pick it up when it goes down to 2.50 on clearance.

 

 

So you think it looks like total crap, but you're still going to buy it on clearance?

 

 

 

 

...weird.

 

what weird is people buying them on clearance period? Don't they realise that why the series is failing (well according to some.) if you can't pay the price then don't collect.

 

So, in other words...Never, ever look for a bargain?? And if you do, you're somehow responsible for the line's potential demise???

 

That's ILLOGICAL.

 

By the time a figure is on the pegs, it's ALREADY been sold, and the manufacturer has ALREADY made their money. It makes no difference whether or not it sells at the SRP ("suggested retail price"), or a marked-down sale price.

 

And, even if it's sold at a discounted price, the retailer still makes money because the retail price is always marked-up from the wholesale price. In other words, what they buy for, say, $2.50 from HASBRO, they sell to you for $9.99 + tax. Even if it's on sales, they're still making a profit, and if the line is profitable, it'll keep being manufactured and sold to consumers.

 

#US1#

 

 

 

 

Very insightful, I did not know that, I am not being sarcastic I did not know that. I always wondered how the manufacturer makes thier money. So Hasbro releases stuff based on what the retailer wants, which is what they think we want? Is that why the Iron man figure are good, and we are getting a Red Hulk BAF, Hulk wave, and limited Edition Hulk because they are popular characters with collector and kids and the retailers want them for sales? So the consumer overall doesn't have really any say in what is distributed. So what is the point of us always doing the Hasbro we want threads? Don't get mad at me I am just wondering.

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Very insightful, I did not know that, I am not being sarcastic I did not know that. I always wondered how the manufacturer makes thier money. So Hasbro releases stuff based on what the retailer wants, which is what they think we want? Is that why the Iron man figure are good, and we are getting a Red Hulk BAF, Hulk wave, and limited Edition Hulk because they are popular characters with collector and kids and the retailers want them for sales? So the consumer overall doesn't have really any say in what is distributed. So what is the point of us always doing the Hasbro we want threads? Don't get mad at me I am just wondering.

 

You've asked a lot of good questions. Let me see if I can answer them for you.

 

First (and generally speaking), the manufacturer makes their money by selling to wholesalers and retailers. Wholesalers are often "middlemen". They sell directly to the retailers. The retailers (TRU, Target, WalMart) are, for the most part, the ones who sell to you and me.

 

So why do we need wholesalers? Well, for the most part, the wholesalers are often responsible for distribution (Like DIAMOND). They make sure the product gets to the retailers shelves. Some industries cut out the middle-men, and sell directly to the retailers. That's generally good for you and me, because it cuts out a layer of cost. I honestly have no idea if HASBRO relies on wholesalers, or ships direct to retailers. Shipping direct to retailers can often be a logistics hassle, which is why some companies prefer to go through wholesale distributors.

 

Anyway, this means that there are generally 4 levels of price involved in an action figure:

 

1. COGS. This means "cost of goods sold". It is the average cost to the manufacturer of producing one (1) figure. It involves everything from the cost of plastic (which involves it's own shipping and wholesaler network) to the labor required to construct the figure. Let's say, for the sake of argument, that a LEGENDS figure costs $1.00 to produce (COGS = $1.00)

 

2. Wholesale Acquisition Cost (often referred to as the "WAC" cost). This is the price that the wholesaler pays to the manufacturer for each figure. Manufacturer's want to make a profit, so let's say, for the sake of argument, that the WAC for a LEGENDS figure is $2.00. WAC ($2.00) - COGS ($1.00) = $1.00 profit to the manufacturer. For each figure produced and sold, the manufacturer has now made $1.00. Make 1 million figures, earn 1 million dollars. Easy, right?

 

3. Retail acquisition cost (I have no idea if this is referred to as "RAC"; I don't think it is). Basically, the same logic applies as in the previous example, just moved forward by one level. The wholesaler sells a figure to a retail outlet for, let's say, $3.00 per figure. Now, the wholesaler has also made a profit (in this case, $1.00 per figure).

 

4. SRP. This is the "Suggested Retail Price". It's generally the level that the manufacturer recommends that the product be sold at on the retail pegs. In most cases, this is the price that's used (however, with cars as the best example, it's often only a benchmark for negotiations). The SRP is higher than the retail acquisition cost so the retailer can make money.

 

So by the time the product is in your hands, the manufacturer has made their money. It's the retailer's responsibility to move the product.

 

Of course, this is highly simplistic. There's all kinds of wrinkles to the relationship between manufacturer, wholesaler, and retailer. Manufacturers push the SRP so they can maintain a particular price at the front-end with the wholesaler. Wholesalers often have "buy-back" deals with retailers to reimburse them for unsold merchandise. That's why you often see older LEGENDS waves popping up at places like KB TOYS, or drug-stores. Generally, these are products that the wholesaler has taken-back from the retailer, and has now moved to a secondary retail outlet (who generally sell at a lower price than when the product first hit the pegs). In addition, sometimes a retailer may be forced to take a loss on merchandise in order to procure a better deal next time, or to maintain exclusivity, etc.

 

Now, as far as how the figures are selected...That's Market Research. Let me get to that tomorrow. My fingers are bleeding.

#US1#

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Very insightful, I did not know that, I am not being sarcastic I did not know that. I always wondered how the manufacturer makes thier money. So Hasbro releases stuff based on what the retailer wants, which is what they think we want? Is that why the Iron man figure are good, and we are getting a Red Hulk BAF, Hulk wave, and limited Edition Hulk because they are popular characters with collector and kids and the retailers want them for sales? So the consumer overall doesn't have really any say in what is distributed. So what is the point of us always doing the Hasbro we want threads? Don't get mad at me I am just wondering.

 

You've asked a lot of good questions. Let me see if I can answer them for you.

 

First (and generally speaking), the manufacturer makes their money by selling to wholesalers and retailers. Wholesalers are often "middlemen". They sell directly to the retailers. The retailers (TRU, Target, WalMart) are, for the most part, the ones who sell to you and me.

 

So why do we need wholesalers? Well, for the most part, the wholesalers are often responsible for distribution (Like DIAMOND). They make sure the product gets to the retailers shelves. Some industries cut out the middle-men, and sell directly to the retailers. That's generally good for you and me, because it cuts out a layer of cost. I honestly have no idea if HASBRO relies on wholesalers, or ships direct to retailers. Shipping direct to retailers can often be a logistics hassle, which is why some companies prefer to go through wholesale distributors.

 

Anyway, this means that there are generally 4 levels of price involved in an action figure:

 

1. COGS. This means "cost of goods sold". It is the average cost to the manufacturer of producing one (1) figure. It involves everything from the cost of plastic (which involves it's own shipping and wholesaler network) to the labor required to construct the figure. Let's say, for the sake of argument, that a LEGENDS figure costs $1.00 to produce (COGS = $1.00)

 

2. Wholesale Acquisition Cost (often referred to as the "WAC" cost). This is the price that the wholesaler pays to the manufacturer for each figure. Manufacturer's want to make a profit, so let's say, for the sake of argument, that the WAC for a LEGENDS figure is $2.00. WAC ($2.00) - COGS ($1.00) = $1.00 profit to the manufacturer. For each figure produced and sold, the manufacturer has now made $1.00. Make 1 million figures, earn 1 million dollars. Easy, right?

 

3. Retail acquisition cost (I have no idea if this is referred to as "RAC"; I don't think it is). Basically, the same logic applies as in the previous example, just moved forward by one level. The wholesaler sells a figure to a retail outlet for, let's say, $3.00 per figure. Now, the wholesaler has also made a profit (in this case, $1.00 per figure).

 

4. SRP. This is the "Suggested Retail Price". It's generally the level that the manufacturer recommends that the product be sold at on the retail pegs. In most cases, this is the price that's used (however, with cars as the best example, it's often only a benchmark for negotiations). The SRP is higher than the retail acquisition cost so the retailer can make money.

 

So by the time the product is in your hands, the manufacturer has made their money. It's the retailer's responsibility to move the product.

 

Of course, this is highly simplistic. There's all kinds of wrinkles to the relationship between manufacturer, wholesaler, and retailer. Manufacturers push the SRP so they can maintain a particular price at the front-end with the wholesaler. Wholesalers often have "buy-back" deals with retailers to reimburse them for unsold merchandise. That's why you often see older LEGENDS waves popping up at places like KB TOYS, or drug-stores. Generally, these are products that the wholesaler has taken-back from the retailer, and has now moved to a secondary retail outlet (who generally sell at a lower price than when the product first hit the pegs). In addition, sometimes a retailer may be forced to take a loss on merchandise in order to procure a better deal next time, or to maintain exclusivity, etc.

 

Now, as far as how the figures are selected...That's Market Research. Let me get to that tomorrow. My fingers are bleeding.

#US1#

 

 

 

 

Thanks for such a good answer, this has allowed me to see how companies like Hasbro really make thier money and the retailer relationship to such companies. This made alot of sense. Are you a marketing or business major at a university by any chance? If so you should think of career in teaching. ;)

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Thanks for such a good answer, this has allowed me to see how companies like Hasbro really make thier money and the retailer relationship to such companies. This made alot of sense. Are you a marketing or business major at a university by any chance? If so you should think of career in teaching. ;)

 

My pleasure. No, I'm not a student or a professor. I do have an MBA, and 12 years experience in marketing and sales.

 

#US1#

 

Actually, let me make a change to something I previously stated about HASBRO's distribution. HASBRO most certainly DOES sell directly to the retailers. In fact, HASBRO sells directly to you and me, the end users, via the internet. So it would appear that they do all of their own distribution without going through wholesalers. Makes complete sense; HASBRO is a big company, they'd understand how it works.

 

What's also interesting is that HASBRO sells direct to consumers at the same price that retailers sell to you on the pegs, the "SRP" (plus, of course, shipping). That would imply that they make more per figure by selling direct than by selling to a retail outlet. Again, this also makes sense. The retail outlet buys far more figures than you or me, so they get a break on the price at which they purchase from the manufacturer. In economics, that's known as "economies of scale". Basically, the more you buy, the less you pay for each item. It's a direct demonstration of price elasticity and margins. You've probably seen this yourself, on a smaller scale, at retail outlets and grocery stores, you know, "Buy 3, get the 4th for Free!", things like that.

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And, even if it's sold at a discounted price, the retailer still makes money because the retail price is always marked-up from the wholesale price. In other words, what they buy for, say, $2.50 from HASBRO, they sell to you for $9.99 + tax. Even if it's on sales, they're still making a profit, and if the line is profitable, it'll keep being manufactured and sold to consumers.

 

Heh, that doesn't explain why the GIJOE 12" 40th anniversary line ( amongst other toys...)aren't being made or sold anymore.

 

Fact is that if a toyline goes on discount it HAS failed, and the retailers that ordered it will not order it anymore because they cannot profit off of it. If your argument is that the retailer is still making money even under a steep discount, then toylines like that would still continue.

The 40th anniversary product DID sell, but ONLY at discount ( regular retail price was $39.99 in most places, common discount was to $14.99), and many retailers actually debuted the product AT a discount because there was apparently no faith that it would sell--and the product had advertising support in spite of this.

 

 

The argument was made against the line that no-one was interested in the old-style GIJOEs, but the figures dissappeared from the shelves in short order regardless of where they were sold and at what price-point they were sold at.

When discounts appear, its a sign that the product ( toy-line)is not profitable and that its failed. The retailer is the deciding factor in determining this. The EXPECTATION with the retailer is that the product will sell at the MSRP, or at their markup, gleaning them the most profit margin--when that does not happen, it suggests to them the product does not have the support they anticipated and has thus failed. This is where the "logic" comes in that if a consumer base buys the product ONLY at discount they have contributed to the product failing.

Everyone is entitled to seek a bargain, but the choices they make and the forces at work in the marketplace make a determination as to the kinds of products that will be available.

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i know that this is a littte off topic but did anyone know that Doc Samson will be making a appearance in the Hulk? you actually saw him in the first trailer where his talking to bruce.

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Thanks for such a good answer, this has allowed me to see how companies like Hasbro really make thier money and the retailer relationship to such companies. This made alot of sense. Are you a marketing or business major at a university by any chance? If so you should think of career in teaching. ;)

 

My pleasure. No, I'm not a student or a professor. I do have an MBA, and 12 years experience in marketing and sales.

 

#US1#

 

Actually, let me make a change to something I previously stated about HASBRO's distribution. HASBRO most certainly DOES sell directly to the retailers. In fact, HASBRO sells directly to you and me, the end users, via the internet. So it would appear that they do all of their own distribution without going through wholesalers. Makes complete sense; HASBRO is a big company, they'd understand how it works.

 

What's also interesting is that HASBRO sells direct to consumers at the same price that retailers sell to you on the pegs, the "SRP" (plus, of course, shipping). That would imply that they make more per figure by selling direct than by selling to a retail outlet. Again, this also makes sense. The retail outlet buys far more figures than you or me, so they get a break on the price at which they purchase from the manufacturer. In economics, that's known as "economies of scale". Basically, the more you buy, the less you pay for each item. It's a direct demonstration of price elasticity and margins. You've probably seen this yourself, on a smaller scale, at retail outlets and grocery stores, you know, "Buy 3, get the 4th for Free!", things like that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I forgot about the fact that they do sell via internet. So there is no wholesaler involved which gives them more profit. So in fact we should badger Hasbro's marketing department for what we want because it is indeed them making the decision of what is manufactured and not the retailer. Well I guess there is nothing wrong with the Hasbro we want threads. Thanks again for your insight! :)

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