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It's called "Bazooka Syndrome". . .


obiwanjacoby
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Never heard of it? Well sure, it's a label I just made up. ;) But I use it to describe something very real that has been in the collective mind of the GIJoe fan community for about the last 20 years or so.

 

Anyone ever notice those little filecards that came on the back of the carded Joe action figure? They were dossiers meant to establish each individual character. Disagree? Please just hear me out for a sec.

 

Take Bazooka for example. According to the filecard, he is a tank driver who has an epiphany about anti-tank weapons. He is a "decisive fast thinker" and a qualified EOD expert.

 

Later on, this well-established; functioning piece of someone else's creativity was reduced to a mere "comedy relief" role in the Sunbow cartoon. This newer, dumbed-down version of Bazooka was barely able to chain a coherent thought together, much less disarm a simple bomb. :rolleyes:

 

Now then, can anyone tell me which version of Bazooka was the most memorable?

 

Correct. The one that got the most "airtime", regardless of the individual who originally established it. This leads most, if not all in the fan community to think, "Well, this is the true Bazooka." Hence, Bazooka Syndrome: The cognitive dissonance in the overall Joe fan community. Tell them the filecards were first; someone is bound to blow a fuse.

 

But there's a small minority of us Joe fans out there that sincerely believe when someone firmly establishes a fictional character continuity, it is a real poke in the eye when someone else comes along and hijacks it to suit their own purposes. Especially in cases of parallel fictional mediums (comic vs. toon). Whether it's for commercial reasons or not, it doesn't matter. Making sudden and arbitrary changes with character continuity destroys the audience's suspension of disbelief, changing the character(s) in question to mere visual templates to empty and then refill. They become fuzzy concepts without any "soul" other than the "writer du jour's" whim of the day.

 

So then as you may have already noticed, "Bazooka Syndrome" is a rampant well-established POV in the Joe community that is (sad to say) a potential source of conflict and misunderstanding among individual fans. :(

 

To many collectors, it doesn't matter at all if a Joe was originally fully fleshed-out on a typewritten sheet of paper, edited for content, and then turned into the main "selling point" to a child in a toystore. This is exactly how it was in my case growing up.

 

Let's be honest here. Not everyone bought the figure just to get the most accessories. Many kids like myself bought the figure for who they were on the back. And as you can well imagine. . .this was a little upsetting later on when we watched the toon. Even at that young age, some of us indeed felt a bit of bait & switch was in play. @grumpy@

 

Furthermore, fans like myself took even more notice when the DiC series came along. "Because they were GIJoe too" ??? Well, at most perhaps in name only. In my opinion, DiC fans represent those with the most severe case of Bazooka Syndrome.

 

And of course, this problem isn't limited to just GIJoe. You can see it in all forms of movie, cartoon, and pop-fiction. It's really not even a problem when you're talking about characters that have been around for 50+ years like say. . .Superman or Batman. As always, change happens. I can easily concede to that.

 

But the complaint from many in my (teenie tiny) camp is that it's detrimental when the change comes too quickly and in a more radical fashion than you would imagine. So in cases of parallel continuity conflict, the winner is the one with the most mass appeal, and not necessarily the best writer (or even the creator himself).

 

LOL, does this make any sense at all, or am I coming across like a nut again?

 

-PJ

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But then look at Sci-Fi. The cartoon managed to make him cool even in neon green. It does, however, make one wonder how they chose Bazooka for that role. Imagine if they had chosen Flint instead. And, if you think back, they actually used Footloose's filecard for his character in the cartoon, which means they didnt' totally ignore the concept. I guess the dart just happened to land on Bazooka.

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My buddy that I played Joes with as a kid and I were discussing this very topic the other day..(while planning our trip to the convention)

 

We found that we "pick and choose" which we recall or favor for particular characters...

 

Take Falcon as an example...we rate File Card and comic as what controls..not the Cartoon Version..

 

But, somehow Leatherneck and Wetsuit got defined by their Cartoon personas.

 

To Us Beachhead took baths etc...

 

But even though we "grew up" playing joes over that last 2.5 decades, even we disagreed as to what defined a couple characters. He chose Cardback/Comics for Snake Eyes..and to me Snake eyes is the Mute Glowing Guy from the Cartoon...

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i agree with the pick and choose thing

 

i remember distinctly basing the characters of wet suit and leatherneck on their cartoon appearance while i relied on the filecards for the characters who didn't get enough screen time

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see i have a dilema - It is a well known fact that Bazooka is my absolute all time favourite G.I. Joe. I have him MOC and I have him mint loose. I can't explain why he's my favourite Joe when everyone clamours for Snake Eyes-this Storm Shadow-that. And I can't really explain why his backpack is apparently velcroed to his football jersey with no clear shoulder straps!

 

But I also love the sunbow cartoon (yes minority I know). And while at first I was upset at how they portrayed him, I kind of blended his filecard and cartoon persona together. See, I view Bazooka as an "idiot savant" or a "rain man" - he's not the sharpest knife in the drawer but give him a bomb to disarm or a tank to blow up and he's a fast decisive thinker!

 

And I'm tierd of hearing "oh he wears red into battle, how stupid" - duh, that's the whole point, it just adds to his idiot savant character.

 

In all the fandom G.I. Joe communities, I can safely say that I'm probably the character's #1 fan...because that's how I roll.

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I also sort of blended Bazooka's characters together... Not to the point where I'd say he's an idiot savant or rainman, just a very slow talker who unfortunately got caught on the camera tripping a couple of times.

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I'm not sure I fully understand the problem. In most cases, we have three "interpretations" of any given character. The cartoon, the comic and the toyline.

 

Each had it's own needs for character development.

 

The toyline had to be brief. Look at the 1982 figures. Most barely had 1 or 2 lines about the character, delving more into their military capabilities. But each year, the characters got more fleshed out (they also got more "comically" aligned).

 

The comic had to develop all those characters at the same time and tell stories that might span several issues.

 

The cartoon had 22 minute stories and that's it. It didn't NEED real individual character development (that, in part, was what the comic was for). What it needed was formulaic characterization. SOMEBODY had to be the "lovable goof". Interestingly enough, Bazooka's "goof" was paired with Alpine in RAH while Tunnel Rat's "goof" was paired with Heavy Duty in Sigma 6. Basically, the comic relief was a necessity. Notice how "boofinish" most, if not all, of the bad guys were? Same reason nobody ever died (helicopters with ejector seats?)

 

The comic, in this case is irrelevant. The comic relief could just have easily been anyone (except Snake Eyes, Duke/Flint and Scarlett/Lady Jaye). I always thought Bazooka's portrayal in the toon was stupid (how could a guy that...simple minded get into the military, let alone a top secret strike team). But then so did Tripwire's and Wild Card's filecards make me thing the same.

 

Hell for several characters, their characteristics seemed to change in the filecards themselves over the course of the newer versions being put out. On rare occasion it worked okay (Shipwreck's filecard when he became a Navy S.E.A.L.). Most didn't (Flint is just "suddenly" a Desert Paratrooper).

 

In part, I think it boils down to how "creative" a person (adult collector or child) IS. As Bandelro pointed out, he was, successfully for him, able to merge the two interpretations (by then the toyline was loosely tied to the comics). Some people ignore the toon (I think most people remember the voices more than anything else. Look at all the fervor over the Transformers movie). But when you played with your Joes, did you REALLY follow EITHER to the "T" or make up your own Joeverse and borrow? If "goofy" Bazooka worked for you, even if you read all the comics, then so be it. That never stopped anyone from NOT using "goofy" Bazooka.

 

The fact we are even TALKING about this is part a testament to the creativity, for good or bad, of the character's creators in development. Just because the cartoon interpretation of a character was "most memorable" doesn't mean that interpretation is automatically assumed to be the "best or most favored" interpretation. Just the "most memorable".

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I just think of him as that guy in the Jersey that I wish they'd bring out again.. with a Jersey.. lol

 

I was never into reading the filecards and crap with I was a kid.. half the time, I gave them my own names and based them off people I knew personally.

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I'm not sure I fully understand the problem. In most cases, we have three "interpretations" of any given character. The cartoon, the comic and the toyline.

 

This is actually a prime example of the problem. See from my POV, there's only two interpretations. Hama and. . .everyone else. Why? Because the Marvel comic and toys were their own united canon (see your 2nd paragraph there). The Sunbow toon and DiC had rotating writers and thus, don't constitute an individual entity.

 

The cartoon had 22 minute stories and that's it. It didn't NEED real individual character development (that, in part, was what the comic was for). What it needed was formulaic characterization. SOMEBODY had to be the "lovable goof".

 

That's mandatory?

 

Interestingly enough, Bazooka's "goof" was paired with Alpine in RAH while Tunnel Rat's "goof" was paired with Heavy Duty in Sigma 6. Basically, the comic relief was a necessity.

 

True, you're establishing a trend here. But that still doesn't make it a mandate.

 

The comic, in this case is irrelevant. The comic relief could just have easily been anyone (except Snake Eyes, Duke/Flint and Scarlett/Lady Jaye). I always thought Bazooka's portrayal in the toon was stupid (how could a guy that...simple minded get into the military, let alone a top secret strike team).

 

My point exactly.

 

But then so did Tripwire's and Wild Card's filecards make me thing the same.

 

My grandfather who served in Italy was neither rocket scientist, nor a team player, but he still became the best sniper in the company. See the difference? While Tripwire is chilly on the job and Wildcard can be trusted with only the toughest of armored vehicles. . .Sunbow Bazooka nearly kills his own team-mates.

 

In part, I think it boils down to how "creative" a person (adult collector or child) IS. As Bandelro pointed out, he was, successfully for him, able to merge the two interpretations (by then the toyline was loosely tied to the comics).

 

True! But why should he have to resort to doing that to begin with? Sure, it settles the problem in his mind, but what happens when it comes up against say. . .an opposing opinion online?

 

Some people ignore the toon (I think most people remember the voices more than anything else. Look at all the fervor over the Transformers movie). But when you played with your Joes, did you REALLY follow EITHER to the "T" or make up your own Joeverse and borrow? If "goofy" Bazooka worked for you, even if you read all the comics, then so be it. That never stopped anyone from NOT using "goofy" Bazooka.

 

That's the point I'm making.

 

In 1986, I was part of a childhood "Joe club" of sorts that didn't have every episode of the toon and few comics. So to avoid arguments, we settled on following the filecards to the "T" (yes, really). We didn't have the money to get every comic, and we didn't all sit in front of the TV every-single-day. Between the four of us, we had all the filecards. For us, it served to settle the old, "bang you're dead/no I'm not" dilemma. :)

 

James: Firefly planted three bombs, who do we have to disarm 'em all?

 

PJ: I got Tripwire.

 

Paul Allen: I got Zap.

 

Jase: Joe team is gonna lose.

 

PJ: Bazooka's an EOD like Tripwire.

 

James: No he's not! He almost blew up Alpine in the toon. He's dumb! That's why I gave him to my little brother.

 

PJ: Lookit the filecard.

 

James (scrambling): Hold on, I think he's under my brother's bed. . .!

 

Just because the cartoon interpretation of a character was "most memorable" doesn't mean that interpretation is automatically assumed to be the "best or most favored" interpretation. Just the "most memorable".

 

I agree Pesatyel, I just wish all fans had your level of insight.

 

-PJ

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Once I lay my hard earned money down for any of this stuff....

 

 

 

 

 

It's MINE to do with, what I want! ^_^

 

 

 

I don't tend to follow canon very well and could care less to tell the truth. This kind of thing is what came along and almost KILLED music for me, and that would be MTV and music VIDEO'S. Everyone had the SAME images going thru their minds whenever they heard the songs now. It almost stole away the larger essence of enjoying music on a personal level, and a single rubber stamped mental visual to go along with the music as we listened to it, took it's place.

 

This is the same with G.I.Joe and all the comic books and cartoons that went along with the characters they made into an action figure. At least there was more than just ONE, but even so, here we see people debating about which one is BETTER than the other, and any use of our imaginations instead of one of these other options...is blasphemy? @hmmm@

 

I had 12" no named Adventure Team Joes to play with when I was a kid, and no comic books and cartoons around to tell me who they were, what rank, strengths, weaknesses & mostly...HOW to play with them. All IMAGINATION of my own, or stolen from a favorite movie, but never the same, and never what the neighbor kid could have imagined up for the days adventure with them.

 

I think that bit of playful, imaginative charm is lost on some of you guys. It's probably why I love and appreciate these guys who do these ongoing dios for us, and go with an all new approach to the story, with very little or NO regard to any prior canon on the characters they use or even make up.

 

THAT'S how I like it, and even though Hama did a helluva job on these toys, by giving them fantastic characterizations to follow, I think it hurt some of you folks, in the spirit of imagination capability, to just play for cryin out loud...just PLAY!

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I'm not sure I fully understand the problem. In most cases, we have three "interpretations" of any given character. The cartoon, the comic and the toyline.

 

This is actually a prime example of the problem. See from my POV, there's only two interpretations. Hama and. . .everyone else. Why? Because the Marvel comic and toys were their own united canon (see your 2nd paragraph there). The Sunbow toon and DiC had rotating writers and thus, don't constitute an individual entity.

 

Well, as I said, initially it didn't appear the toyline and comic were related. As both grew they became so, but only loosely.

 

The cartoon had 22 minute stories and that's it. It didn't NEED real individual character development (that, in part, was what the comic was for). What it needed was formulaic characterization. SOMEBODY had to be the "lovable goof".

 

That's mandatory?

 

Interestingly enough, Bazooka's "goof" was paired with Alpine in RAH while Tunnel Rat's "goof" was paired with Heavy Duty in Sigma 6. Basically, the comic relief was a necessity.

 

True, you're establishing a trend here. But that still doesn't make it a mandate.

 

Maybe not an "official" mandate (I dunno), but most "team toons" had similar aspects. But almost always there was a "comic relief" character (Michelangelo) and the "straight man" (Donatello), the Leader (Leonardo), the "strong willed" female (April O'Neal), the "bad ass" (Raphael)

 

 

But then so did Tripwire's and Wild Card's filecards make me thing the same.

 

My grandfather who served in Italy was neither rocket scientist, nor a team player, but he still became the best sniper in the company. See the difference? While Tripwire is chilly on the job and Wildcard can be trusted with only the toughest of armored vehicles. . .Sunbow Bazooka nearly kills his own team-mates.

 

Well I always saw G.I. Joe as THE "best of the best". The characteristics portrayed by Sunbow Bazooka, and filecard Tripwire/Wild Card most likely wouldn't allow them to last too long in the regular military let alone an elite unit like the G.I. Joe team. But then, they also have on the team a guy who's official team "job" is "Samurai Warrior".

 

In part, I think it boils down to how "creative" a person (adult collector or child) IS. As Bandelro pointed out, he was, successfully for him, able to merge the two interpretations (by then the toyline was loosely tied to the comics).

 

True! But why should he have to resort to doing that to begin with? Sure, it settles the problem in his mind, but what happens when it comes up against say. . .an opposing opinion online?

 

I think VH said it pretty succintly:

 

Once I lay my hard earned money down for any of this stuff....

 

It's MINE to do with, what I want! ^_^

 

THAT'S how I like it, and even though Hama did a helluva job on these toys, by giving them fantastic characterizations to follow, I think it hurt some of you folks, in the spirit of imagination capability, to just play for cryin out loud...just PLAY!

 

We ARE NOT REQUIRED to follow any standard format but to use the present information as best we see fit. I find it odd you say "resort to". How many actually kept the characterizations as "set in stone" characterizations, never deviating from what was written? I dare say nobody did. And I'm not even talking toon vs comic. Everybody "made it their own". For Bandelro, speaking specifically of Bazooka, that was merging the two making something wholly unique.

 

And given everything that's been said, your ". . .an opposing opinion online" is moot and irrelevant.

 

 

Some people ignore the toon (I think most people remember the voices more than anything else. Look at all the fervor over the Transformers movie). But when you played with your Joes, did you REALLY follow EITHER to the "T" or make up your own Joeverse and borrow? If "goofy" Bazooka worked for you, even if you read all the comics, then so be it. That never stopped anyone from NOT using "goofy" Bazooka.

 

That's the point I'm making.

 

In 1986, I was part of a childhood "Joe club" of sorts that didn't have every episode of the toon and few comics. So to avoid arguments, we settled on following the filecards to the "T" (yes, really). We didn't have the money to get every comic, and we didn't all sit in front of the TV every-single-day. Between the four of us, we had all the filecards. For us, it served to settle the old, "bang you're dead/no I'm not" dilemma. :)

 

James: Firefly planted three bombs, who do we have to disarm 'em all?

 

PJ: I got Tripwire.

 

Paul Allen: I got Zap.

 

Jase: Joe team is gonna lose.

 

PJ: Bazooka's an EOD like Tripwire.

 

James: No he's not! He almost blew up Alpine in the toon. He's dumb! That's why I gave him to my little brother.

 

PJ: Lookit the filecard.

 

James (scrambling): Hold on, I think he's under my brother's bed. . .!

 

Just because the cartoon interpretation of a character was "most memorable" doesn't mean that interpretation is automatically assumed to be the "best or most favored" interpretation. Just the "most memorable".

 

I agree Pesatyel, I just wish all fans had your level of insight.

 

-PJ

 

That may be a good example of bad imagination.

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This is the same with G.I.Joe and all the comic books and cartoons that went along with the characters they made into an action figure. At least there was more than just ONE, but even so, here we see people debating about which one is BETTER than the other, and any use of our imaginations instead of one of these other options...is blasphemy? @hmmm@

 

No, not blasphemy. . .because there's nothing really to blaspheme. That's the problem. It's just needless confusion about the identity of a toy that was initially sold with an identity.

 

We'll get into discussions about our personal opinions about Joes, but the bottom eventually drops out because we really have nothing to base it on (like you're saying). For example, we complain about the 25th Baroness' more "cartoony" look about her, but we don't have any opposite to argue for other than our own indie creativity and opinion. It cuts both ways, see.

 

THAT'S how I like it, and even though Hama did a helluva job on these toys, by giving them fantastic characterizations to follow, I think it hurt some of you folks, in the spirit of imagination capability, to just play for cryin out loud...just PLAY!

 

I also played Star Wars as a kid, and sure there were a few of us who were "creative enough" to imagine Chewie could speak English and had rocket engines in the holes of feet.

 

But the unwritten rule was that there was some creativity you just didn't share with you buddies. ;)

 

-PJ

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Well I always saw G.I. Joe as THE "best of the best". The characteristics portrayed by Sunbow Bazooka, and filecard Tripwire/Wild Card most likely wouldn't allow them to last too long in the regular military let alone an elite unit like the G.I. Joe team. But then, they also have on the team a guy who's official team "job" is "Samurai Warrior".

 

1. You 100% sure about that?

 

2. This is what I'm talking about. :)

 

That may be a good example of bad imagination.

 

Maybe, but to go that route, you'd have to throw the baby out with the bathwater. "Bad imagination" is an incredibly vague and equally subjective label to throw around (see my previous post).

 

-PJ

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How many actually kept the characterizations as "set in stone" characterizations, never deviating from what was written?

 

Me and my friends. Yes, we DO exist. Don't deny it. @loll@

 

I dare say nobody did.

 

Then you're sadly marginalizing those who did. Maybe we saw it within a kind of "Star Wars" structure. On my block, Han Solo stayed the collectors case for a couple years until he was "unfrozen" in '83. Sure it was anal, but we thought "everybody" was doing it that way, and we didn't know there was anyone that played otherwise. Get it?

 

-PJ

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Well, in light of your story about a typical days PLAY with G.I.Joe and having to refer to the specs on a bio card about each individual character, I'd say "bad" imagination might not be the correct way of describing it, and that POOR imagination would be better.

 

You used enough imagination to get them into the predicament, but didn't have enough to get them out of it, without checking back to the instruction sheet. @lol@

 

With your logic, you probably would have kicked the kid, with his own custom Joe, out of the house or yard along with his frankenjoe. There's no identity pre attached to a customized Joe, so in your world of canon correct ONLY Joe play, he didn't exist and the poor kid went packing? @smilepunch@

 

Hell, with Super Trooper you wouldn't even need any other Joes, as he was a one man ARMY, that'd kick everybody's behind, according to the filecard anyway. What the hell fun is that? Ya gotta lighten up on this STRICT adherence to one canon over another and just have some fun.

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How many actually kept the characterizations as "set in stone" characterizations, never deviating from what was written?

 

Me and my friends. Yes, we DO exist. Don't deny it. @loll@

 

I dare say nobody did.

 

Then you're sadly marginalizing those who did. Maybe we saw it within a kind of "Star Wars" structure. On my block, Han Solo stayed the collectors case for a couple years until he was "unfrozen" in '83. Sure it was anal, but we thought "everybody" was doing it that way, and we didn't know there was anyone that played otherwise. Get it?

 

-PJ

 

 

Ah, but that's my point. WHICH interpretation did you use? You said you fell back to the filecards as the "deciding factor" but the filecards didn't necessarily always follow the comics in and of themselves. Even your example used at least two interpretations (toon and toy).

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If hasbro had such a problem with how the cartoon was representing their characters why'd they let it run on for a few seasons as well as a movie? Oh... that's right. Filecards don't sell toys.

 

I love cartoon bazooka. Alpine was getting uncomfortably close to him though.

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Well, in light of your story about a typical days PLAY with G.I.Joe and having to refer to the specs on a bio card about each individual character, I'd say "bad" imagination might not be the correct way of describing it, and that POOR imagination would be better.

 

But it sure made the characters "come alive" and saved alot of time during the sleepover--by not having to hash out what every mystery figure's name, rank, and serial number was. We actually started out where Snake Eyes could talk and Flash had rocket boosters in his shoes. But we needed help. And there was a writer out there who didn't talk down to us.

 

We learned things from those files that we were more readily able to use. Geez, some of it was on the level of a Tom Clancy novel. All that does is encourage imagination, not limit it.

 

"Wow, what the heck is hypoxia?"

 

"I dunno, but now we have to figure out how Ace can fly high enough to get that Strato Viper, any ideas?"

 

"Let's build something out of this McDonal's cup!"

 

"YEAH!"

 

With your logic, you probably would have kicked the kid, with his own custom Joe, out of the house or yard along with his frankenjoe. There's no identity pre-attached to a customized Joe, so in your world of canon correct ONLY Joe play, he didn't exist and the poor kid went packing?

 

Yeah. . .as a matter of fact, we did just that. @smilepunch@ You saying that's a "bad thing"? We bent a little bit and allowed substitues for established characters that we hadn't bought yet. Say if a kid down the block wanted to bring his Frankenjoe or something. But back in the day, customs was largely viewed as ruining what your own mom bought you (about as bad as an M-80), and so in order to play with us, you had to have the right limbs on the right guy. You saying that's a "bad thing"?

 

Hell, with Super Trooper you wouldn't even need any other Joes, as he was a one man ARMY, that'd kick everybody's behind, according to the filecard anyway. What the hell fun is that?

 

That's why no one ordered him that I knew of growing up. And the Steel Brigade trooper filled the role that you're talking about nicely. He was our "loophole". ;)

 

Ya gotta lighten up on this STRICT adherence to one canon over another and just have some fun.

 

"I gotta?" It's how we played. All I'm arguing for is the right to state it.

 

I blame all of this on Bazooka Syndrome of course. :D

 

-PJ

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If hasbro had such a problem with how the cartoon was representing their characters why'd they let it run on for a few seasons as well as a movie? Oh... that's right. Filecards don't sell toys.

 

Exactly! I never said Hasbro had a problem with it, just some of the kids.

 

And apparently very few of them at that.

 

-PJ

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I think however you young fellas played with your G.I.Joe toys as a kid was a-ok fine and dandy by me. ;)

 

You liked G.I.Joe and that's all that matters MOST!

 

I believe the problem here, only arises when somebody tries to claim another's interpretations of the canon surrounding the RAH era of Hasbro's G.I.Joe, is wrong or lame and THEIRS is right and true.

 

I don't care about any of it. They all contributed somehow in some way, to the great success of the toy over those years between 1982-1994 and it's effects are still felt today by you fellas. Pretty impressive stuff.

 

The arguing over which canon is better is still pretty lame though. @smilepunch@

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Well I always saw G.I. Joe as THE "best of the best". The characteristics portrayed by Sunbow Bazooka, and filecard Tripwire/Wild Card most likely wouldn't allow them to last too long in the regular military let alone an elite unit like the G.I. Joe team. But then, they also have on the team a guy who's official team "job" is "Samurai Warrior".

 

1. You 100% sure about that?

 

2. This is what I'm talking about. :)

 

That may be a good example of bad imagination.

 

Maybe, but to go that route, you'd have to throw the baby out with the bathwater. "Bad imagination" is an incredibly vague and equally subjective label to throw around (see my previous post).

 

-PJ

 

 

What? :unsure:

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Ah, but that's my point. WHICH interpretation did you use? You said you fell back to the filecards as the "deciding factor" but the filecards didn't necessarily always follow the comics in and of themselves.

 

That's news to me. Any examples?

 

-PJ

 

 

 

 

In 1986, I was part of a childhood "Joe club" of sorts that didn't have every episode of the toon and few comics. So to avoid arguments, we settled on following the filecards to the "T" (yes, really). We didn't have the money to get every comic, and we didn't all sit in front of the TV every-single-day. Between the four of us, we had all the filecards. For us, it served to settle the old, "bang you're dead/no I'm not" dilemma. :)

 

James: Firefly planted three bombs, who do we have to disarm 'em all?

 

PJ: I got Tripwire.

 

Paul Allen: I got Zap.

 

Jase: Joe team is gonna lose.

 

PJ: Bazooka's an EOD like Tripwire.

 

James: No he's not! He almost blew up Alpine in the toon. He's dumb! That's why I gave him to my little brother.

 

PJ: Lookit the filecard.

 

James (scrambling): Hold on, I think he's under my brother's bed. . .!

 

Is that not both the "toon interpretation" and the "filecard" interpretation?

 

 

But it sure made the characters "come alive" and saved alot of time during the sleepover--by not having to hash out what every mystery figure's name, rank, and serial number was. We actually started out where Snake Eyes could talk and Flash had rocket boosters in his shoes. But we needed help. And there was a writer out there who didn't talk down to us.

 

Distinctly NOT part of any interpretation.

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