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Major Bludd: what the hell happend to his robotic arm?


skullfire

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Bludd for as long as I can remember always had some cool looking robotic arm and now it seems that he's been designed w/ out one. I was hoping that the DTC figures would have corrected this but no.

 

I guess when I get my major bludd, (my tru now carries single carded dtc yeah) I need to hunt down a bat to steal the robotic arm from to make bludd into a cool ass figure.

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Well, going by the first version, the arm was DEFINATELY not just an armored cover. It only has 2 fingers and a thumb.

no, the hand was sculpted poorly, but the card art clearly shows a hand with four fingers and a thumb and one that is definitely normal, not robotic.

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Although I haven't been pleased with much of the DTC figures, Maj. Bludd is clearly one of the better ones. I'm really not missing the "armor-plated" arm that much myself, he looks better without it i think. I never thought it was cybernetic, in the cartoon it just looked like armor.

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HI ALL

 

DIDNT MAJOR BLUDD LOSE A HAND IN FIGHTING WITH

GENERAL REY IN THE DDP SERIES I THINK IT WAS NUMBER36 OR 37 ?????

 

CAUSE THATS WHEN THE COIL CAME AND MEDIC HIM OUT HE STUCK HIS

ARM IN THE SAND ????

 

 

 

ROBuk

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Well, going by the first version, the arm was DEFINATELY not just an armored cover. It only has 2 fingers and a thumb.

no, the hand was sculpted poorly, but the card art clearly shows a hand with four fingers and a thumb and one that is definitely normal, not robotic.

 

Not to mention that those three fingers were oversized, and could have easily accomodated more than one regular finger inside the armored ones.

 

As for the DDP series, yeah, he did lose the hand, which was likely a "fan wank" to give Bludd that cybernetic appendage that everyone has been wondering about for 20 years...

 

Justin

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Id definetly would like to see all future Bludds with the Armour on his Arm. I aways thought of the arm as having"bionic qualities".

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I'm surprised no one's been speculating about the sanity involved in being decked out with about 30 hand grenades, like his Sonic Fighters/RAH Collection figure. I'll grant that it looks cool, but man, running into battle next to him is a suicide mission in itself! :)

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>>As for the DDP series, yeah, he did lose the hand, which was likely a "fan wank" to give Bludd that cybernetic appendage that everyone has been wondering about for 20 years...>>

 

You nailed it. When Josh first started the book in 2001, he wanted to give Bludd a cyborg eye to "match" his robot arm... but astute fans (myself included) pointed out that it was just a piece of blast-proof armor to keep him safe when he fired his missile-gun.

After a week or so, preview art that showed Bludd with the shiney cyborg eye disappeared, and the patch returned.

 

Its hard to tell if the "fan wank" was Josh's idea, to legitimize his previous misconceptions, or Brandon Jerwa's (who's devotion to the fans was admirable, but sometimes over-reaching good taste).

 

Either way, not only was it an imbecilic move, catering to a small portion of fans who haven't figured it out already (and thanks to threads like this, that number is ever dwindling...), but it was done *solely* to hype up a 1-dimensional non-toy character who is introduced, and put in charge of GIJoe in the span of a few pages... such a fan-fiction cliche, and this was done by a legitimate publisher. *Sigh!*

 

Oh, yes, and the three-fingered glove is an actual real-world garmet, meant to handle things at extremely high temperatures, and is thus fireproof.

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Well, going by the first version, the arm was DEFINATELY not just an armored cover. It only has 2 fingers and a thumb.

no, the hand was sculpted poorly, but the card art clearly shows a hand with four fingers and a thumb and one that is definitely normal, not robotic.

 

 

The whole thing was poorly sculpted. Why they didn't add an elbow joint is still beyond me.

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>>The whole thing was poorly sculpted. >>

 

No more than the reast of the 82/83 figures. Reread my post above, the three-fingered glove Major Bludd is wearing exists inreal life, and it's main purpose is to keep the hand safe from fire and hot temperatures. Which makes perfect sense for a guy launching missiles from his gun!

 

That's not poor sculpting, that's right on the money!

 

>>Why they didn't add an elbow joint is still beyond me.>>

 

I don't see why people aren't satisfied calling it what it is: A cost-cutting manuever.

 

Remember that Bludd, initially, was a late 82 mail away, much like the Cobra Commander (except only available to those who ordered CC, instead of a widely-advertised mail-away). He was, technically, the first figure made with the Swivel arm battle grip from conception. The rest of the first swivel arm wave were merely rereleases of the 1982 team, with new arms (andsome slight retooling,I know).

 

Much like Snake-Eyes in 82, Bludd's arm was the cost-effective "downgrade" that leveled out the price of producing that figure as, esentially, a free give-away.

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Interesting that Hasbro would go to the trouble of producing only one swivel arm for Bludd rather than just not bothering at all if they were trying to cut costs. Though I suppose people would be more likely to feel ripped-off if they got a figure that had two fewer points of articulation than even the straight arms of 82 rather than only one.

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I don't see why people aren't satisfied calling it what it is: A cost-cutting manuever.

 

It's a very irrational cost-cutting measure when considering it probably would have costed less to add the elbow that's pretty much the same across all Joes.

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>>It's a very irrational cost-cutting measure when considering it probably would have costed less to add the elbow that's pretty much the same across all Joes.>>

 

Not when the arm was so *incredibly* different from anything in the line to that point. What's easier? Pioneering a new type of articulation for a sinlge arm, or just leaving it alone, and casting two less parts per figure than if you made it swivel-arm articulated.

 

Not saying you're wrong for wondering, but in the 15 years I've been a Joe fan, and of all the people I've talked to in that time, from Hasbro and elsewhere, that's the best answer I've ever heard. And it has the unimpressive ring of truth to it... there's no sinister motive, no abandoned cyborg subplot. Just a company justifying their bottom line, and offering an incentive to the kids who supported their fledgling line (and at the same time encouraging them to buy more, for Flag Points if nothing else).

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I see your point Straight Edge, and I have no problem with it if that's truly the case; it makes sense. But I'm still wondering why Hasbro, if worried about costs on a "free" figure, why even begin making a new arm? If they were that worried about the bottom line they should have just waided until 83 to intruduce swivel arm and just given Bludd two previously used arms. Look at all the other mail-in premiums: Hooded CC (same body as CC), Starduster (major frankensteining), the same for Steel Brigade and Name Your Own Cobra. Granted, those were released well into the line when Hasbro was making some nice cash (Hooded CC was really early though), but still, you see my point? They had even more capital then and went with an even more cost effective means of delivering free figures. Just my thoughts. :)

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You hit the nail on the head, tho... all those other figures were well into the line. Even hooded CC was just a repaint of the original Battle Helmet CC (with the head being the only new part).

 

Major Bludd was initially produced when the options for Frankensteined figures were virtually nill. Also, he was produced for the Mail-Order thing as a sort of "sneak peak"of the 1983 offerings, Hasbro had every intention of releasing him as he did eventually come: a carded figure in the regular line.

 

So making him yet another generic figure in the vein of the embarrassingly self-same 1982 line, when the rest of the year's line was going to be so strikingly varied, just doesnt make any sense, either. Beleive it or not, Hasbro *was* innovative at the time, they wanted to do big things. But they've always been a business, and have always had their eye on the bottom line. So Bludd's design (which began as a drawing on a piece of paper... a medium where all things are possible) was more ambitious than the budget allowed, and they cut a small corner to bring him back down.

 

Like I said, not a glamorous take on the figure's origins, but not every dark corner of the history of G.I.Joe deserves to have a light shone on it. Some things just happened because they happened. And beyond the overactive imaginations of some wishful fanboys (and believe me, I've heard so many insane conspiracy theories, I still laugh when I think of some), there's never been a shred of evidence that Bludd's stiffened arm was anything more than a way to cut costs.

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Yeah, I was thinking of Bludd as a sneak preview (much the same as the mail away Duke), but just wanted to look at the other aspects of his release. And I do agree: making Bludd the same as the rest of the painfully repetitive (though classic) original line up would have been a joke. It would be cool to have either an original Bludd figure with a recast, swivel-arm with the armor, or one with just another regular arm to match the original. Anyway, it's fun to think about why stuff was or wasn't done with the original line.

 

One last thought: I think it's possiblethat a lot of people disregard (or would like to at least deny) the "cost-cutting" explanation because of how they see the RAH line. I was looking at another thread a few days ago (I forget which site) about re-use of molds during the RAH era, but beyond a few examples, and considering the sheer volume of product, RAH was very creative and obviously far more varied than JvC etc. offerings of the past few years. Now, I do prefer the old stuff, but still like the new stuff, so I'm not bashing. It's merely a comparison between the percentage of repainted/frankensteined figures and the total number of figures released, and the cost cutting just seems more blatant now. Anyway, I'm rambling on. All that to say that maybe people, in retrospect, expect more from Hasbro's intentions/motivations during the '80's than they do of the current product.

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One last thought: I think it's possiblethat a lot of people disregard (or would like to at least deny) the "cost-cutting" explanation because of how they see the RAH line. I was looking at another thread a few days ago (I forget which site) about re-use of molds during the RAH era, but beyond a few examples, and considering the sheer volume of product, RAH was very creative and obviously far more varied than JvC etc. offerings of the past few years. Now, I do prefer the old stuff, but still like the new stuff, so I'm not bashing. It's merely a comparison between the percentage of repainted/frankensteined figures and the total number of figures released, and the cost cutting just seems more blatant now. Anyway, I'm rambling on. All that to say that maybe people, in retrospect, expect more from Hasbro's intentions/motivations during the '80's than they do of the current product.

 

I think the Key point is Volume: For each figure Hasbro could sell a hell of a lot more of each figure back in the 80's than they could in the 90's hence which part re-use and entire repaints became more common again towards the end of RAH, when they'd all but disappeared (sub-groups asside, as they tended to be to handle demand higher than Hasbro could produce new molds (Tiger force) or to provide store exlusives) in the middle of the line.

 

The situation now is even more extreme, just about every Joe item had production comparable to the rarest RAH items (and DTC has far less), they also (when at retail) stay on the pegs for far less time. This means even more re-use of existing tooling.

 

Hasbros "greater creativity" in the 80's was nothing but larger returns on investment which led to Bigger budgets.

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